First Listen: Typhoon, 'White Lighter'

Play associated audio

Kyle Morton writes songs for Typhoon as if they were the last works he might ever create. His band is big by rock standards, with somewhere in the neighborhood of a dozen members playing mighty, powerful songs whose instrumentation conveys big, bold joy. But underneath it all are the words of a young man living on what he feels is borrowed time. When he was young, Morton contracted a serious case of Lyme disease; he suffered multiple organ failures and required a kidney transplant from his father. Basically, his childhood was taken from him.

For the past few years, I've been following Morton — now 27 — and his big band of horns, strings, drums and guitars from Portland, Ore. They've put out some memorable music, but the new White Lighter takes the promise they've shown and delivers completely. The uplifting melodies and rhythms that sway and swing, mixed with lyrics about hopeless dreams and cold realities, works so well. It's the kind of combination that has me singing words over and over — words that, if laid on paper, might not be ones I'd want stuck in my head. They're dark, but in that darkness can be found a sincere appreciation for the gift of life.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

'National Review' On How Donald Trump Is Changing The Campaign

The prominent conservative magazine National Review dedicated a whole issue to denouncing Donald Trump. Editor Rich Lowry talks about how Trump is reshaping the state of conservatism.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.