Omar Grows Up To Become 'The Man' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Omar Grows Up To Become 'The Man'

Play associated audio

British singer Omar was a child musician back in the '70s and '80s, but he's done a lot of growing up since then. Now married with two daughters, Omar has a new album, The Man, which marks a turning point in his life.

"It's about changing," he says. "Since I've had [my girls], there's a purpose to my life now. It's about growth, development and evolution."

The Man is the singer's first project in seven years. Stripped down to a natural level, the album is assembled in a way that hearkens back to the musician's early days.

"This album is the most organic of my seven albums. I've really tried to re-create that live sound," he says. "That's why I like listening to music from the '60s and '70s, 'cause that's basically — you got to do stuff in one take. And everyone's in one room and all playing together; there's nothing quite like that vibe.

Though he has a family now, Omar says he'll continue to make music a part of his life.

"Music is in my blood," he says. "It's just there."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

For P.D. James, A Good Mystery Celebrated Human Intelligence

The British author of best-selling detective stories has died at age 94. "In a sense, the detective story is a small celebration of reason and order in our very disorderly world," she told NPR.
NPR

Can Breeders Cure What Ails Our Breast-Heavy Turkeys?

The standard commercial American turkey is the product of decades of intense selective breeding. But breeding for efficiency and size has created new health problems scientists must grapple with.
NPR

EPA's Proposed Rules Add To Obama's Collision Course With GOP

The Environmental Protect Agency has drafted regulations on Ozone pollution. The latest move exposes divisions between the Obama administration and leading Republican lawmakers over the environment.
NPR

Millennial Doctors May Be More Tech-Savvy, But Is That Better?

Text messages from your doctor are just the start. Millennials are the next generation of doctors and they're not afraid to say "chillax" in a consultation or check Twitter to find medical research.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.