Jittery Jams: 10 Songs For Coffee Lovers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Jittery Jams: 10 Songs For Coffee Lovers

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All week, Morning Edition has been examining how coffee fits into modern life, which led us to look into the many ways the drink's trembling tendrils have reached into popular music. With the Beastie Boys taking their "sugar with coffee and cream," Carly Simon finding "clouds in my coffee," and countless singers using black coffee as a metaphor for a life in need of a swift kick, it was actually tough to narrow a caffeinated playlist down to just 10 selections.

This week, Alt.Latino is also looking at how the beverage has inspired music in coffee-producing countries. But in the meantime, for addicts and abstainers alike — as well as we honorary imbibers who subsist on a steady diet of Diet Coke via IV drip — here are 10 more coffee songs, by artists from Bach to Dethklok to Yung Joc. (And, come to think of it, at many points outside that particular spectrum.) Be sure to add your own selections in the comments.

Get the playlist on Spotify and Rdio.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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