Kenny Chesney's Steamy Summer Jam | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Kenny Chesney's Steamy Summer Jam

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One of this summer's hottest songs comes from the biggest name in country right now: Kenny Chesney. "Come Over" is a track from Welcome to the Fishbowl, which debuted in June as the second-most-popular album in the U.S. across all genres — second only to Justin Bieber's Believe.

Though Welcome to the Fishbowl does deal with Chesney's life in the spotlight, as its title implies, it also holds plenty of Chesney's bread and butter: songs about love. In "Come Over," the album's single, Chesney sings about a painful breakup, but as one would expect from him, it's less sad than it is steamy.

"There's something about Kenny Chesney. He is sexy," says music journalist Danyel Smith, our guide to the charts. "Guys want to be like Kenny Chesney and girls are hoping for a wink from Kenny Chesney."

Smith says "Come Over" is a perfect example of Chesney's masculine appeal.

"I think this is when he's at his best," she says. "He's sort of asking something or explaining something but he's not preachy or gooey or anything like that. It's really just kind of dudish — kind of manly."

Chesney is filling stadiums and arenas across the country right now with Tim McGraw, in what the Los Angeles Times has dubbed the "summer hunk fest."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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