And Now For The Lighter Side Of Egypt's Revolution | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

And Now For The Lighter Side Of Egypt's Revolution

Play associated audio

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is wrapping up his Revolutionary Road Trip, a journey of more than 2,700 miles across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team have traveled from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya, and filed this report from the third and final country, Egypt.

When Egyptians completed the first round of their presidential election last month, an online news website featured the following headline: "Election results disrupt bodily functions among millions of Egyptians."

El Koshary Today may be Egypt's closest counterpart to The Onion, the satirical American news website.

Two founders of El Koshary Today invited us to their table at a central Cairo bar named Hurriya, which means freedom. It is the plainest of places, with concrete floor and wooden chairs.

The bartender doesn't ask if you want a beer; he just delivers green bottles of an Egyptian brand, Stella.

One of the founders is Hazem Zohny, 27, who writes the satirical paper part time while finishing a masters degree.

Zohny says he mocks the news because he finds it depressing. A recent El Koshary headline quoted the government saying, "Complaining to strangers may lead to annihilation."

It may sound absurd, but it's really just tweaking an actual message by the government, which ran ads warning Egyptians not to talk with foreigners.

No Shortage Of Material

Zohny's co-writer and childhood friend, Taha Belal, has also thought of his own ads as religious conservatives press for more power in Egyptian society.

"I wanted to make an ad — we have this little section for ads — so I wanted to make a Head and Shoulders ad for beards," says Belal. Maybe the dandruff shampoo can help people who show their faith by growing long beards.

"I feel like it's going to be more marketable these days," Belal says.

The growing presence of religious conservatives has prompted the owners of this bar to nail boards over the windows so that devout passers-by won't have to see the beer.

It's a good thing, because eight empty bottles somehow accumulated on our table. We also had some lemon chili-flavored chips.

It's fitting that we talked over some food, because El Koshary Today is named after a common Egyptian dish: basically a bowl of spaghetti with a lot of things added.

"Koshary is sort of a very reflective meal of the country in the sense that it's a very chaotic kind of meal," Zohny says.

The plate can offer a mix of lentils, pasta, rice, chickpeas and more.

Competition In Writing Parody

El Koshary Today does not publish daily — only when inspiration strikes.

The 2011 revolution gave the paper plenty of fodder, as did this year's elections, which led to Zohny's headline about disrupting Egyptian bodily functions.

"I think this was not so much satirical as a real kind of news report," he says. "The level of shock was really quite overwhelming."

A Muslim Brotherhood politician, Mohammed Morsi, was in the presidential runoff held Saturday and Sunday, facing a military-backed candidate, Ahmed Shafiq.

Zohny recalls a journalist who recently wrote, "The political situation in Egypt has rendered parody news obsolete."

Zohny sees the truth in this. "It is getting really hard to come up with parody news because the news has become a parody," he says.

And there are other challenges as well, Zohny and Belal say.

Egyptian parody has exploded, appearing so swiftly on the Internet after every news event that El Koshary Today knows it will have to write something good to compete.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

In Texas, Obama Sets Stage To Answer 'Do-Nothing' Congress

President Obama knows he's unlikely to get support from Texas' predominantly Republican congressional delegation, but being rebuffed will make it easier for him to shift blame to the GOP.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.