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Nancy Pearl Unearths Great Summer Reads

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Unlike a lot of people I know, my summer reading doesn't differ significantly from the reading I do the rest of the year. I'm always looking for new authors, older titles I might have missed, books I want to reread, and a nice mixture of fiction and nonfiction. While I understand the concept of beach reading, for me it doesn't mean light reading, but rather choosing books whose ultimate destruction by sand and water won't concern me overly much because I know that I can easily replace them. (For example, I've now bought — over the years — four copies of Guy Gavriel Kay's The Lions of Al-Rassan, because I take it with me each summer to reread and it always ends up too grit-stained to take home.)

So here's a diverse selection of books I've enjoyed recently, including two mysteries; a reprint of a book long out of print; a beautifully written, emotionally resonant memoir; and a moving and important novel about a group of American soldiers, survivors of a firefight in Iraq, back in the United States for a victory tour. I hope you'll find at least one that sounds good to you.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

It Takes A Nation: Art For Social Justice At The American University Museum

As the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, graphic artist Emory Douglas created striking visual images for the movement's publications and posters.

NPR

Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

Viewed for decades as capitalist exploitation, tipping is now encouraged at some upscale urban restaurants catering to wealthy young customers. Restaurateurs insist it's strictly voluntary.
WAMU 88.5

It Takes A Nation: Art For Social Justice At The American University Museum

As the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, graphic artist Emory Douglas created striking visual images for the movement's publications and posters.

WAMU 88.5

DDOT Questions Metro's Ability To Protect People With Disabilities For Ride-Hailing Paratransit Trips

As Metro looks to reduce the cost of its expensive MetroAccess paratransit service, they're turning to ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft to provide low-cost trips. Some critics say they represent a race to the bottom.

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