Filed Under:

    Pew Study: Americans In The Northeast Have More Economic Mobility

    Play associated audio

    A new study from the Pew Charitable Trusts finds economic mobility differs significantly across the United States. The report finds Americans are more likely to move up the economic ladder if they live in the northeast.

    The states with the highest mobility rankings are Maryland, New York and New Jersey. During the 10-year period studied, residents there were more likely to have experienced stronger income growth and to have raised their economic standing relative to other Americans. People in those states were also less likely to be downwardly mobile. Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Utah also scored well.

    "The fact that different state residents experienced different rates of mobility means where you live matters," said Erin Currier, director of Pew's Economic Mobility Project.

    Nine states in the South, including Texas and Florida, had worse economic mobility than the national average. Oklahoma, Louisiana and South Carolina had the lowest scores. Currier says other Pew studies have identified the factors that most affect mobility.

    "We know that there are certain drivers of mobility and they include things like educational attainment, savings and asset building and neighborhood poverty during childhood, among other things," said Currier.

    Two-thirds of African-Americans grew up in poor neighborhoods, and they are less likely to move up the economic ladder and more likely to move down than other Americans.

    (John Ydstie is correspondent for NPR.)

    Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit


    Revisiting Rabin's Assassination, And The Peace That Might Have Been

    Twenty years ago, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was killed by a Jewish religious zealot. Dan Ephron, author of Killing a King, discusses the assassination and its effect on the peace process.

    King Of Beers: SABMiller Agrees In Principle To Merger With Budweiser Brewer

    If the deal is formally agreed upon, the company would own around 31 percent of beer sales around the world.

    LIVE CHAT: Join NPR's Politics Team For The Democratic Debate

    Join us over on Twitter during the debate by following and contributing to #nprdebate or @nprpolitics, or post your comments, questions and observations here.

    Twitter, Its Share Price Dropping, Plans To Cut Up To 8 Percent Of Workforce

    How do you say, "Wall Street is getting frustrated," in 140 characters?

    Leave a Comment

    Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.