Get To Know The Song Of The Year Nominees: Mumford And Sons' 'The Cave' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Get To Know The Song Of The Year Nominees: Mumford And Sons' 'The Cave'

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This Sunday the annual Grammy Award winners will be announced. One of the biggest categories is Song of the Year, which goes to a songwriter. Every day this week, we'll give you a little intel on one of the nominees. Today, Mumford and Sons' "The Cave."

If you watched the Grammys last year, you might remember Mumford and Sons playing "The Cave" during the telecast. The British band wasn't known all across America before last year's performance, but right afterward, sales of its album Sigh No More went way up, more so than those of any of the other acts that also played last year. Mumford and Sons didn't even win anything that night.

The band's Grammy performance almost certainly gave the song enough of a bump that it had a second life. The Grammys cultivate their own stars, and Mumford's trajectory exemplifies that.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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