Facebook's Early Investors May Have Much To Like | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Facebook's Early Investors May Have Much To Like

Play associated audio

Facebook filed to go public this week, and many analysts expect that it will be valued between $75 billion and $100 billion on the day of its initial public offering. That would make Facebook more valuable than GM, Ford and even Goldman Sachs.

What's most remarkable is that the company has barely 3,000 employees, and many of them are about to become very, very rich.

There's this guy, David Choe. Back in the day, Facebook hired him to paint graffiti murals all over the company's original office space in Palo Alto, Calif. Even Marc Zuckerberg got into the act.

Choe was paid for his work in stock. And according to The New York Times, that stock could soon be worth $200 million.

One of the guilty pleasures of an IPO filing is getting to peer inside a company as famous as Facebook and get a glimpse of who owns what. Of course there's Zuckerberg.

"Obviously, he should be worth a tidy $25 billion," says Henry Blodget, editor of Business Insider and the bad-boy analyst of the last Internet boom.

This time the bad boys are becoming billionaires — like Sean Parker, Facebook's first president. Before that, he co-founded Napster.

"The man who, in the movie at least, famously said 'a million isn't cool — a billion is cool,' " Blodget says. "And he will have several of them."

In that movie, The Social Network, Dustin Moskowitz had little more than a cameo. He was Zuckerberg's college roommate, but he could soon be worth $7 billion.

"If he had been down the hall, we wouldn't be talking about him," says Michael Stern, who runs the website Who Owns Facebook. He says Moskowitz wasn't the only winner of the roommate lottery. Zuckerberg's prep school roommate will get a couple hundred million.

"A lot of people won the lottery here," Blodget says. And, he says, not all of these future billionaires are men.

After Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's options vest, "she's going to be one of the richest self-made women ever," Blodget says.

According to its filings, Facebook has close to 1,100 stockholders. Many more could benefit from restricted stock options. But Robert Frank, who writes the Wealth Report blog at the Wall Street Journal and is the author of the new book The High-Beta Rich, says that doesn't mean all these folks will become instant millionaires.

"More than half of this company is owned by just five large shareholders," he says. "So, like most of America, wealth in Facebook is very top-heavy, concentrated among just a few people at the top."

In Silicon Valley, it's become conventional wisdom that Facebook's IPO will create 1,000 new millionaires. And while that may be true, Frank says it's impossible to know for sure.

"Even those with a lot of shares will see their wealth fluctuate wildly. So the number of millionaires may change," he says.

After all, this is a tech stock, and Frank says all this wealth is just on paper — at least for now.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'This Fight Begins In The Heart': Reading James Baldwin As Ferguson Seethes

Protests in Ferguson, Mo., continue in response to the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by police on Aug. 9. The incident reminds author Laila Lalami of James Baldwin's Notes of a Native Son.
NPR

Specialty Food And Agriculture Startups Are Ripening In Greece

Sotiris Lymperopoulos left a good job in Athens to collect wild sea greens for upscale restaurants. Food startups like his may be able to generate thousands of new jobs in post-crisis Greece.
WAMU 88.5

Testimony: Maureen McDonnell Was Prone To Angry Outbursts

In the corruption trial of former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, a former staffer says the ex-first lady became increasingly volatile as she prepared for public appearances.
NPR

We Are What We Google: How Search Terms Reflect Our Wealth

David Leonhardt recently compared the terms people search for online in places The New York Times figures life is easiest, against the counties where it's hardest. He discusses the results with Robert Siegel.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.