No Love For November, Sports' Drama-Free Month | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

No Love For November, Sports' Drama-Free Month

Play associated audio

There's an awful lot of games played in November –– even with the NBA locked out –– but it's really just an in-between month in sports... and life. There are no May-and-November romances, no good November songs. It's sort of a semi-final of a month.

Why are they still playing tennis in November? Let the boys and girls rest up for the summer so they're not all hurt when it matters.

Likewise, golf. Many purists say Tiger Woods shouldn't have been picked for the Presidents Cup team. Of course he should have. Otherwise, nobody would even be talking about the Presidents Cup, like I am now –– even though I don't have the foggiest idea what it is. But it's played in November, somewhere. Go, Tiger.

Let me be the first to say that 2011 is surely the worst year in history for American athletes on the world stage. Has there ever been a year when foreigners were heavyweight champion, fastest man in the world, and No. 1 in both men's and women's golf and tennis? Whatever happened to the lone Yank, taking on the world? There are no John Waynes left in American sport.

The NCAA has come up with a new grading schedule in which it promises to keep big-time teams out of its championships if the so-called student athletes don't have a high enough grade-point average. Here's what my friend, The Sports Curmudgeon, has to say about that: [gruff voice] "Garbage in, garbage out. All those colleges are experts at getting academically-unqualified athletes into school and keeping them eligible, and the NCAA can't catch anybody. You don't think now if their players have to have higher grades they can find a way to cheat at that, too?" Thank you, Sports Curmudgeon.

I'm going to look into what the Presidents Cup is and get back to you on that.

Every time I hear something new about the country of Turkey playing a larger role in the world, I double down my bet that Instanbul will be chosen as the city for the 2020 Summer Olympics.

When players and owners have labor disputes, like in the NBA now, the ones I side with are the small-market teams. I care more about them than I do the big-market teams or the players and agents. Small market is the entity that needs the most help today, in whatever sport. Once the small-market owners are happy with a deal, then I'm satisfied that it must be a fair enough settlement.

There's a stupid movie out now claiming William Shakespeare didn't write Shakespeare. Well, after listening, time and again, to how singers butcher both our National Anthem and our national hymn at ball games, if I were Francis Scott Key and Irving Berlin I would want a movie claiming that I didn't write The Star-Spangled Banner and God Bless America.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Passages' Author Reflects On Her Own Life Journey

Gail Sheehy is famous for her in-depth profiles of influential people, as well as her 1976 book on common adult life crises. Now she turns her eye inward, in her new memoir Daring: My Passages.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Texas Gubernatorial Candidates Go To The Border To Court Voters

Republicans have won every statewide office in Texas for 20 years, but the growing Hispanic population tends to vote Democrat, and the GOP's survival may depend on recruiting Hispanic supporters.
NPR

In San Diego, A Bootcamp For Data Junkies

Natasha Balac runs a two-day boot camp out of the San Diego Supercomputer Center for people from all types of industries to learn the tools and algorithms to help them analyze data and spot patterns in their work.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.