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This Week On Metro Connection: D.C. General

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Once a hospital, D.C. General now serves as an emergency shelter for hundreds of D.C. families.
WAMU/Martin Austermuhle
Once a hospital, D.C. General now serves as an emergency shelter for hundreds of D.C. families.

More than a decade ago, the District began sheltering homeless families in the city's abandoned public hospital, D.C. General. The number of people living in that facility has grown dramatically, and now there's intense scrutiny following the disappearance of eight-year-old resident Relisha Rudd.

This week we'll go inside D.C. General, and talk with families about conditions inside the sprawling campus. Plus, we'll meet children coping with homelessness, and find out how teachers at nearby schools struggle to help these kids learn. We'll also hear from political leaders and advocates about the push to shut down D.C. General, and what that closure would mean for D.C.'s growing number of homeless families.

Music: "Homecoming" by Eric Shimelonis from Winter Passing

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