Virginia Residents Score Victory In Battle With Loudoun Board (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Residents Score Victory In Battle With Loudoun School Board

MR. JONATHAN WILSON

00:00:03
Our next story is about a tiny elementary school in a tiny community in western Loudoun County, Virginia. It's called Aldie Elementary, and is located in an unincorporated town of the same name. With 134 students, Aldie is one of the smaller public schools in our region. Parents love the community feel of the school, and students say that its size makes it easier to navigate than a bigger school.

MR. JONATHAN WILSON

00:00:26
But for years, Aldie has been under the ax as the school district looks to find ways to cut spending. This year, the school board went further than ever in making plans for the elementary's closing, but as Lauren Ober reports, Aldie parents are fighting back, and winning, at least for now.

MS. LAUREN OBER

00:00:44
Andrew Sutphin is a third-grader at Aldie Elementary. He thinks he has a pretty good handle on what makes his school special.

MR. ANDREW SUTPHIN

00:00:51
It's nice and small, and the kids are all nice. And every once in a while, it's just fun. It’s my favorite school of all time.

OBER

00:01:01
Aldie Elementary might be Andrew’s favorite school of all time, but until just a couple of days ago, it was also something else, it was a school in jeopardy. In order to close a $38 million budget gap, the county school board was weighing whether to close Aldie, as well as Hamilton, Hillsboro and Lincoln elementary schools. Combined, these schools educate just under 500 students, far fewer than the average elementary school in Loudoun, which serves about 650.

OBER

00:01:30
School Board Chairman Eric Hornberger suggested the closures would save the district about $2 million.

MR. ERIC HORNBERGER

00:01:36
The reality is now we have several things happening. One is we have a budget issue that we have to address. The second thing is, we have been watching as a school board for the last several years a continual decline in elementary school population in western Loudoun.

OBER

00:01:50
But on Tuesday, the school board voted six to three to keep the small schools open, at least for now. Aldie Elementary will soon begin the process of applying to become a public charter school. Next door to Aldie, the tiny Middleburg Elementary, population 50 students, also recently became a charter school to save itself from the chopping block.

OBER

00:02:11
Whether to close these quaint community schools isn't a new issue for the county. The school board has grappled with the question for years. And every time the proposal comes up, people raise the same objections, students won't get the same personalized education, the community will lose a critical institution and the rural foundation of the town will erode. And...

MS. RACHEL HOLLINGER

00:02:34
If you close all these schools, think about it, all of the great teachers there won't have jobs, that would be sad.

OBER

00:02:46
That's then 6-year-old Rachel Hollinger, speaking at a hearing on the same issue in 2009. She went on to implore the school board...

HOLLINGER

00:02:53
There are other ways to find money you need. Please don't close Aldie school. Thank you.

OBER

00:03:05
Five years ago, the Loudoun County Public School Board found a way to keep Aldie open. But Eric Hornberger says it's getting harder and harder to justify accommodating rural places like Aldie, especially when enrollment is declining. Growth is happening in the eastern part of the county in places like Sterling and Ashburn, the region Hornberger represents. That growth will likely march west, but school board members wonder whether it’s enough to warrant keeping small schools open.

HORNBERGER

00:03:32
It's not a matter of if these schools will close, it's only a matter of when.

OBER

00:03:37
If that seems harsh, that's because county residents elected Hornberger and his fellow board members to make tough decisions based on what’s best for the majority.

HORNBERGER

00:03:46
There are trade-offs. No matter what the school board does in reconciling its budget, there are trade-offs. And there will be people who are unhappy.

OBER

00:03:53
Stacy Sutphin, Andrew’s mom and the president of the Aldie PTA, is one of many parents who rallied around the school, hanging banners around the town that read "Save Aldie" and crunching the numbers for alternative solutions. She disagreed with the claim that closing Aldie would save the district money.

MS. STACY SUTPHIN

00:04:10
They are suggesting by closing the four schools, it will save them $2 million. In fact, it could end up costing more. We're educating below the county average, our building is paid for and our land is paid for. So that’s where our fight comes in.

OBER

00:04:25
In the end, the school board agreed with her. After listening to the testimony of nearly 180 supporters of the four small schools, board members, including Jill Turgeon, who represents Aldie's region, voted to spare them. School board chair Eric Hornberger voted against the schools. For parents like Cheryl Hutchison, who sent four children to Aldie Elementary, the fight was about more than just the school. It was about what the shuttering, should it come to pass, would do to Aldie. In a town where many people still live down long dirt lanes lined with trees, the community school is its beating heart. Close it, and what's left of the town?

MS. CHERYL HUTCHISON

00:05:05
Once you start taking away stuff from the small villages, you start losing the villages. We become just a pass-through on a road. The town could disappear. And I would hate to see that happen.

OBER

00:05:18
For now, Hutchison's fears have been allayed, but the battled to keep rural Loudoun intact wages on. I'm Lauren Ober.
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