Proposed Legislation Would Put The Brakes On Wage Theft (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

Proposed Legislation Would Put the Brakes on Wage Theft

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:03
We turn now from getting around to getting paid. Or in the case of this next story, not getting paid, even though you're supposed to. Over the past year, the D.C. Council has focused a lot on workers' rights. It's increased the minimum wage, and insured that everyone who works has access to paid sick days. Now another labor issue is coming to the fore, and it has to do with employers who refuse to pay workers what they're owed. Lauren Ober has the story.

MS. LAUREN OBER

00:00:28
For five months, Mario de la Cruz went to work on a D.C. construction site where he made $15 an hour laying tile, installing floors and putting up siding. Then, without notice, his employer stopped paying him. Still, the Guatemalan immigrant, continued working.

MR. MARIO DE LA CRUZ

00:00:46
(Speaks foreign language)

OBER

00:00:53
He says he kept working because up to that point, he'd always gotten paid on time and in full. But after a month, de la Cruz still hadn't received a paycheck. With overtime, his boss owed him almost $5,000. De la Cruz approached the supervisor, who gave him the runaround. And that's when he decided to go over his boss's head.

CRUZ

00:01:14
(Speaks foreign language)

OBER

00:01:21
He asked the head of the construction company where his money was. A year later, de la Cruz is still waiting for an answer. The kind of thievery that Mario de la Cruz experienced is common in fields like construction and hospitality, where many low-wage workers don't have employment contracts or access to human-resources departments. Two out of every three low-wage workers are likely to experience some form of wage theft, says Ari Weisbard, the deputy director of the District's Employment Justice Center.

MR. ARI WEISBARD

00:01:52
Wage theft is any time a worker doesn't get paid what he's supposed to. So sometimes that means they're getting paid less than they were initially promised, after they do all of the work. And sometimes it means they're not getting paid at all.

OBER

00:02:03
Annually, low-wage workers lose an average of about 15 percent of their income to wage theft, Weisbard says.

WEISBARD

00:02:10
For low-wage workers, this is one of the most important issues.

OBER

00:02:13
Weisbard's organization and others around the District have been lobbying the D.C. Council to pass legislation that would help victims of wage theft have their day in court. And, ideally, get the money they've earned. In February, Council members Mary Cheh, Jim Graham and Vincent Orange introduced the Wage Theft Prevention Act. It would overhaul wage and hour enforcement in the District by increasing penalties for unscrupulous employers and creating formal hearings for workers.

WEISBARD

00:02:43
They would have the right to go in front of this administrative law judge and present their case and argue, you know, this is how much I was offered, this is how many hours I worked, but I was only paid this amount. And the employer would have an obligation to actually show up. Right now they can ignore the Office of Wage Hour and basically delay a case indefinitely.

OBER

00:03:02
Last year, the Office of the Attorney General fielded complaints from 45 workers who claimed to be victims of wage theft. Their claims totaled almost $130,000 in lost wages. And those are only the people who spoke up. Nikki Lewis has worked all types of restaurant jobs, from server to bartender to manager. Along the way, she's seen countless instances of wage theft, starting with her own when she was a trainee server.

MS. NIKKI LEWIS

00:03:29
Typically, when you're not actually receiving tips, you are entitled to be paid the full minimum wage. After training for two weeks, though, not receiving any tips, I got my paycheck, and it was for $34. And I was like, what? Like, and I was really depending on a substantial check.

OBER

00:03:52
Lewis confronted her supervisor, who told her she had actually signed a document when she was hiring acknowledging that the restaurant would only pay her the tipped worker minimum wage, even though she would not be earning any supplementary tips.

LEWIS

00:04:05
In the fine print, it said that we're only going to pay you $2.33 an hour. So that's illegal. I at least should have been paid the minimum wage.

OBER

00:04:14
Lewis left the restaurant industry a few years ago and is now the executive director of D.C. Jobs With Justice, a worker rights organization. She recently spoke at a D.C. Council hearing on the Wage Theft Prevention Act. One of the people to testify was Mario de la Cruz. Through an interpreter, he told the panel about his experience with wage theft, and why he was speaking out.

CRUZ

00:04:36
(Speaks foreign language)

OBER

00:04:44
"If I don't do anything," he told the panel, "companies will continue to take advantage of workers and not pay them what they're owed. And for de la Cruz and others fighting for fair pay, that's just not right. I'm Lauren Ober.
Transcripts of WAMU programs are available for personal use. Transcripts are provided "As Is" without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. WAMU does not warrant that the transcript is error-free. For all WAMU programs, the broadcast audio should be considered the authoritative version. Transcripts are owned by WAMU 88.5 FM American University Radio and are protected by laws in both the United States and international law. You may not sell or modify transcripts or reproduce, display, distribute, or otherwise use the transcript, in whole or in part, in any way for any public or commercial purpose without the express written permission of WAMU. All requests for uses beyond personal and noncommercial use should be referred to (202) 885-1200.