Door To Door: Kentlands, Md. And Glen Carlyn, Va. (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

Door to Door: Kentlands, Md. and Glen Carlyn, Va.

MR. JONATHAN WILSON

00:00:03
And now, our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit Kentlands in Gaithersburg, Md., and the Glencarlyn neighborhood of Arlington, Va.

MR. NEIL HARRIS

00:00:18
My name is Neil Harris, I'm 58 years old, and I live in the Kentlands, which is a "new urbanist community" in Gaithersburg, Md. Well, Kentlands was a planned community that actually worked according to plan, which is fairly rare. People come from all over to see the Kentlands and to try to understand why it works. The Kentlands is on the west side of Gaithersburg, just off of Highway 270, if you get off 270 at 370, and then come up Great Seneca Highway. We're the large community on the left of Great Seneca.

MR. NEIL HARRIS

00:00:53
I live on Main Street in the Kentlands, which is a street bounded by live-works homes, which are much like you see in a big city like Washington, D.C., rows of store fronts with residences and office spaces up above.  The community is very walkable.  It's really built to be like a small town in the suburbs where it's self-contained.  There's a shopping district.  There are residential areas and it's very easy to get from one point to another, and as you walk down the street, you typically will see people that you know and say hello and maybe go have a cup of coffee or a glass of wine or whatever.  It's really a very, very strong sense of community compared to other places in the suburbs that I have lived over the years.

STEVE ERICKSON

00:01:44
My name is Steve Erickson, I'm 58 years old, and I live in the Glencarlyn neighborhood. The Glencarlyn neighborhood is located in Arlington. It is bounded on the north by Arlington Boulevard, on the west by Carlin Springs Road, on the east by Glencarlyn Park, and on the south by Virginia Medical Center. The land around here was surveyed by George Washington, and in the local library here, we have some of his surveyor marks on a tree to mark his original land.

STEVE ERICKSON

00:02:18
In the late 1800s, a fellow named Carlyn moved here and built a resort in an area that is now Glencarlyn Park, and his resort was available to the folks from Washington, D.C. who would come out by train. The oldest standing structure in Arlington is the John Ball House, and you can see that, you can take tours of it. Down the street from that is the original town hall that was built in the late 1800s, still serves as a town hall for the community.

STEVE ERICKSON

00:02:51
Glencarlyn is really an ideal place to live because it's a combination of a very modern neighborhood that has access to lots of shopping and lots of entertainment. It's also a very old neighborhood with lots of history, and lots of folks that will live here a long time.  So I think it's a good combination between the two.

WILSON

00:03:08
We heard from Neil Harris in Kentlands and Steve Erickson in Glencarlyn. If you think your neighborhood should be part of "Door to Door," send an email to metro@wamu.org, or visit us on Facebook. That's Facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And to see a map of all the doors we've knocked on so far, visit our website, metroconnection.org.

WILSON

00:03:41
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Rebecca Sheir, Jacob Fenston, Byran Russo and Lauren Ober, along with reporter Chris Klimek and NPR's Susan Stamberg. WAMU's managing editor of news is Memo Lyons. "Metro Connection's" managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Tyler Daniels. Lauren Landau and John Hines produce "Door to Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and metroconnection.org.

WILSON

00:04:13
Our theme song, "Every Little Bit Hurts," and our "Door to Door" theme, "No Girl," are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis, and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can find all the music we use each week on metroconnection.org. Just click on a story, and you'll find information about its accompanying song. And if you missed part of a show, you can stream the whole thing on our website by clicking the "This Week On Metro Connection" link. You can also subscribe to our podcast there, or find us on iTunes, Stitcher and the NPR News app.

WILSON

00:04:46
We hope you can join us next week when our theme will be barriers. We'll head out to the coast for the first in a two part series on Virginia's Barrier Islands. We'll find out what life was like for people who lived on those islands, and what drove them to flee to the mainland back in the 1930s. Plus, we'll talk with lawmakers about the barriers to housing for transgender people in Maryland.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN

00:05:07
It seems as if the population in Maryland is very open to GLBT rights. I don't know why my colleagues would want to put the break on it now.

WILSON

00:05:17
I'm Jonathan Wilson, in this week for Rebecca Sheir, and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 News.
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