Transcripts

Tiny Dyke Marsh Gets New Lease On Life On The Potomac

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:03
Staying in Virginia, we'll head back to a spot we visited more than a year ago. Dyke Marsh. It's one of the last fresh water tidal wetlands on the Upper Potomac River, and has been eroding for years. Environmental advocates say the wetland could very well disappear in just a few decades. But, as environment reporter Jonathan Wilson tells us, things may be looking up.

MR. JONATHAN WILSON

00:00:25
Brent Steury is trudging through frozen winter grass along the banks of a path known as the Haul Road. Occasionally, he leans precariously over the marsh to take a closer look at the reedy plants sticking up from the mud. He's looking for something called River Bulrush. It's a type of sedge rare enough to be on the list of endangered species in Virginia. Dyke Marsh is one of the only places in the state where it grows.

MR. BRENT STEURY

00:00:50
See that? See that one come up. It's broken off half way up and hanging down.

WILSON

00:00:53
Yep. Yep. Yep.

STEURY

00:00:54
That's a river bulrush.

WILSON

00:00:55
Steury says it's likely that river bulrush was much more plentiful here before Dyke Marsh started shrinking. The path that we're on, the Haul Road, is part of that story. The road got its name, H-A-U-L, because it was built in the 1930s when construction companies needed a road on which to haul the sand and gravel they were dredging out of the bottom of the Potomac. The dredging took its toll on the marsh.

STEURY

00:01:17
If you squint your eyes and look over there towards 495, you can see a white buoy out in the middle of the river. That's where the edge of the marsh used to be. You can see where it is today.

WILSON

00:01:27
Dyke Marsh once covered several hundred acres. The dredging, and the erosion that's taken place since it stopped in the 1970s, has shrunk the marsh by more than half. In a recent study by the US Geological Survey showed the dredgers compounded the problem when they dug away a thumb shaped promontory about 10 acres in size. A finger of land that once protected the wetland from damaging storm waves.

STEURY

00:01:50
When they mined it, they had to create these deep channel scars all along the edge of the marsh so the barges could get in to ship the material out. So now the wave energy can come right up to the very edge of the marsh before the waves crest and break and they release all their energy on the marsh.

WILSON

00:02:05
And so, at this time last year, scientists finally had a handle on all the reasons why nearly two acres of the marsh were disappearing each year. And why the marsh was particularly vulnerable to north-tracking storms, storms like Hurricane Sandy and Isabel. But Glenda Booth, President of the nonprofit "Friends of Dyke Marsh," had little reason to believe that the millions of dollars in federal assistance needed to restore the marsh, were likely to come through.

MS. GLENDA BOOTH

00:02:31
Given what's going on in the Congress, and the National Park services' needs nationwide, finding funds to restore Dyke Marsh was going to be very challenging.

WILSON

00:02:44
Part of Brent Steury's job was applying for a chunk of money that the Department of Interior had available for restoration efforts after Hurricane Sandy. Steury is a soft spoken government biologist, about as even-keeled as you would expect of someone who studies the life cycles of aquatic plants and animals. But, as he describes, finding out that his grant application was successful this fall, he gets, well, a little breathless.

STEURY

00:03:11
They wanted me to write the press release, and I said, I don't even know how much money we're getting yet. How much are we getting? And the person who was doing the national press release wrote me back and said, you're getting the full amount. 24.9 million. Wow.

WILSON

00:03:24
Right now, the park service is in the midst of studying exactly how the money will be used. But rebuilding the promontory section of the wetland will certainly be key. Steury says he'll likely have to write another grant application for funding to deal with all the invasive vine species suffocating the swamp forest on the other side of Haul Road. But for now, he can get some solace from the fact that his arguments for saving Dyke Marsh are getting the attention he always thought they deserved.

STEURY

00:03:50
We know how fast it's going away. We know why it's disappearing. Look, Dyke Marsh is gonna be gone in 30 years unless somebody takes some action.

WILSON

00:03:58
And now, thanks to a little hard work and a lot of hard science, someone is. I'm Jonathan Wilson.
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