Door To Door: Trinidad, D.c. And Brookdale, Md. (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Door to Door: Trinidad, D.C. And Brookdale, Md.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:03
And now, our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit D.C.'s Trinidad neighborhood and the Brookdale section of Bethesda, Maryland.

MS. AMY RISPIN

00:00:19
My name is Amy Rispin. I live in the Orchardale section of Brookdale, which is a community celebrating its 75th anniversary since its founding in 1938. And we are in Bethesda near Friendship Heights. Two farms ultimately gave rise to the community Brookdale. Isaac Shoemaker's farm, and the other was James Henry Leftborough's farm, which was originally a plantation set up by his grandfather Nathan, who was the first treasurer of the United States Federal Government.

MS. AMY RISPIN

00:00:56
Brookdale north and south have some very characteristic English style homes and it's not cookie cutter. The people who live in some of those homes love the fact that although lots are not very big, they have privacy. No porch faces another porch. Years ago, one of my colleagues, she took public transportation, which took her a great deal of time, because it was before the Metro.

MS. AMY RISPIN

00:01:22
And, so, I would give her a ride at the end of a day back to this neighborhood, and I observed the community life. I could see people walking their dogs. I could see how pleasant it was, how people seemed to really know each other, and I set my sights on it.

MS. MARQUI OCTAVIA LYONS

00:01:45
My name is Marqui Octavia Lyons, and I live in the Trinidad community. Trinidad is located in the northeast quadrant of the city, basically bound by Florida Avenue, West Virginia Avenue, Trinidad and Mt. (unintelligible) Road. The population is changing, and right now, and I see that we have an influx of more para professionals moving into the area, both African American and Caucasians.

MS. MARQUI OCTAVIA LYONS

00:02:10
One thing that I can say is that the citizens came together to fight the crime that was so publicized in the media. We came together, regardless of what sector -- if you lived in the northern or the southern area of Trinidad, to combat the fighting and we took back our neighborhood. Determined that we were not going to allow the media or anyone to give us an identifying code as a crime ridden area.

MS. MARQUI OCTAVIA LYONS

00:02:41
But we speak to one another in the morning. When we walk to the bus stop, we greet each other with hello, how are you? And as a way of checking on each other, if you don't see someone at the bus stop, over a period of two or three days, you start to inquire what is the well being of that person. And, so for that reason alone, I felt safe and I want to be a part of a community that continues to care about its residents.

SHEIR

00:03:09
We heard from Amy Rispin in Brookdale and Marquis Octavia Lyons in Trinidad. If you'd like us to knock on your doors, so you can talk about your neighborhood, send an email to metro@wamu.org or send us a tweet. Our handle is @wamumetro. And we have a map of all the doors we've knocked on so far on our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:39
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Emily Berman, Jonathan Wilson, and Steven Yenzer, along with reporter Lauren Ober. WAMU's managing editor of news is Memo Lyons. Metro Connection's managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Steven Yenzer. Lauren Landau and John Heinz produce "Door to Door."

SHEIR

00:04:00
Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website. Our theme song, "Every Little Bit Hurts" and our "Door to Door" theme, "No Girl," are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings record company. You can find all the music we use each week on our website, MetroConnection.org. Just click on a story and you'll find information about its accompanying song.

SHEIR

00:04:23
And if you missed part of the show, you can stream the whole thing on our website too, by clicking the "This Week On Metro Connection" link. You can also subscribe to our podcast there or find us on iTunes, Stitcher, and the NPR news app. We hope you can join us next week when we'll explore the idea of coming of age. We'll learn how one faith community teaches young people about sexuality, and why it's planning to create a similar class for adults. We'll meet a young man whose coming of age story involves foster care and the juvenile justice system. And we'll hear how teens in Tacoma Park view the city's decision to lower the voting age to 16.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #1

00:05:01
I think I have plenty of friends who are more politically mature than probably the vast majority of Americans.
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