WAMU 88.5 : Metro Connection

From A To B: Anger Over Va. Road Plan Boils Over

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Construction taking place along a portion of the Capital Beltway in Virginia.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wfyurasko/5573373595/
Construction taking place along a portion of the Capital Beltway in Virginia.

Homeowners and environmentalists are mobilizing to slow down the McDonnell administration's push to build a major north-south highway in Northern Virginia. That road, dubbed an "outer beltway" would connect Prince William and Loudoun Counties, brush the western fringe of Manassas Battlefield and arcing west of — and eventually connecting to — Dulles Airport. Martin Di Caro explains the latest on that controversy, as well as the turmoil surrounding D.C.'s taxicabs. Drivers are all supposed to have credit card machines by September 1, which will cause an increase in base fares. But app-based taxi hailing services like Uber and mytaxi say the switch to credit card payments in traditional taxis will push them aside — because of a technical obstacle.

[Music: "A to B" by The Futureheads from The Futureheads / "Sunshine Superman" by Gabor Szabo from Bacchanal]

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