Door To Door: Poolesville, Md. And Lamond-Riggs, D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Door To Door: Poolesville, Md. And Lamond-Riggs, D.C.

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Caesar Dudley in his home in the Lamond Riggs neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
Caesar Dudley in his home in the Lamond Riggs neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

It's our weekly trip around the region. This time we visit Poolesville, Md., and Lamond-Riggs in Northeast D.C.

Poolesville, Md.

Poolesville, Md. doesn't fit in with many of the large, suburban towns around it in Montgomery County. The town is small, with a little less than 5,000 people. And it's rural, being surrounded by the Montgomery County Agricultural Reserve. But Eddie Kuhlman loves that culture. It reminds him of a time long ago.

"It resembles Mayberry from the Andy Griffith Show," Kuhlman says. "It's a very caring community. Close. You know most everybody. And it takes you a good while to go to the store because you bump into people you know and you end up talking."

Kuhlman says that the close-knit feeling comes from the town's traditions, including its annual Poolesville Day celebration in September. He says traditions like Poolesville Day unite the town and connect the residents.

"I believe this coming September will be the 21st one," Kuhlman says. "And it's a great day. It's from one end of the town to almost the other end of town lined up with kids and church groups. It's probably attended by 15,000 to 20,000 people. It's just a wonderful day, and it's grown every year."

Lamond Riggs in Washington, D.C.

Caesar Dudley moved into the Lamond Riggs neighborhood of Washington, D.C. back in 1959, and he remembers a different neighborhood than what he sees now.

"We came here when it was a very quiet, undisturbed neighborhood," Dudley says. "We didn't have Metro. It was just a livable community."

But over the years, those houses have gradually morphed into commercial buildings. A Metro Station has moved in close by. Apartments and condominiums have been added. The culture has changed. But Dudley doesn't see those changes as bad, necessarily, just different.

"It's still changing," Dudley says. "But we all have adjusted. We don't want to lose this as a neighborhood and a community."

Even with the growth in Lamond Riggs, Dudley says that the town is still full of older residents around his age. For him, that's comforting.

"We have people here 30, 40, 50, 60 years," Dudley says. "And now, some of them are gone. And some are old and on walkers. But they're still active! We keep up with each other. That's what makes it such a great community. We share and care with one another. We get to know each other as neighbors. Knock on doors. Sit down and drink coffee with each other. It just makes it a good neighborhood to live in."


[Music: "No, Girl" by John Davis from Title Tracks ]

Explore previously featured neighborhoods on our Door to Door map:

This map shows previous Door to Door segments, and includes links to photos and show audio. The yellow marker represents neighborhoods featured in Washington, D.C., the blue represents neighborhoods in Maryland, and the red represents neighborhoods in Virginia.

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