Transcripts

Door To Door: Tenleytown And LeDroit Park, D.C.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:10
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door" we visit Tenleytown and LeDroit Park, in Northwest D.C.

MS. LAUREN CASE

00:00:18
My name is Lauren Case, I'm 45 years old and I live in Tenleytown, Washington D.C. It is between Massachusetts and Wisconsin Avenues, the Tenleytown Metro stop is about three blocks away. So it's upper Northwest.

MS. LAUREN CASE

00:00:36
You have people who have lived here for a long, long time. you have a lot of families with kids of all ages ranging from infants to toddlers, elementary school, middle school, high school, and then kids that have gone on to college.

MS. LAUREN CASE

00:00:54
Being able to walk around having your kids know how to navigate the Metro and buses, access to parks and all that D.C. has to offer is just really great. My favorite part is the maple tree in my neighbor's front yard, particularly in the fall. But I think just the people and the sense of commodore that we have in this neighborhood and looking out for each other.

MS. LAUREN CASE

00:01:19
If you want to live in a neighborhood where you have access to public transportation, access to great schools, and to all the great things that D.C. has to offer this neighborhood's for you.

MR. ERIC FIDLER

00:01:40
My name is Eric Fidler and I'm 28 and I live in LeDroit Park. LeDroit Park was founded in the 1870s and started as an exclusively white neighborhood and then a few decades later around the turn of the century it became notable as the home of Washington's black intelligentsia and a lot of notable people lived here.

MR. ERIC FIDLER

00:02:02
LeDroit Park is really notable for two things, its architecture and its history. And I think the more I research its history, the more I realize that it actually plays a very important role in African American history in the United States. It's the people who lived here. You research it and you find, you know, there was people here who were, you know, doing protests and sit-ins long before the Civil Rights movement, they were really ahead of their time.

MR. ERIC FIDLER

00:02:29
The three and a half years that I've lived here, I've seen numerous houses that were vacant or run down, renovated and repaired. There's a new park which sort of highlights the fact that there a lot of kids here in this neighborhood too. There are people who have houses that are over a million dollars and then we also have public housing, so it's a pretty diverse community.

MR. ERIC FIDLER

00:02:50
And The Howard Theater was just renovated and it's beautiful, especially at night, to walk home after work or class and walk by it, it looks almost magical.

SHEIR

00:03:01
We heard from Lauren Case in Tenleytown and Eric Fidler in LeDroit Park. Your neighborhood can be part of "Door to Door" too. Just send an email to metro@wamu.org or visit us on Facebook. That's facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And to see a map of all the doors we've knocked on so far, visit our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:37
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Jacob Fenston, Emily Berman, Sabri Ben-Achour, Jonathan Wilson and Tara Boyle along with reporter Jocelyn Frank. WAMU's managing editor of news is Meymo Lyons. "Metro Connection's" managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Rachel Schuster. Lauren Landau, Rachel Schuster and John Hines produce "Door to Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

SHEIR

00:04:05
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts" and our "Door to Door" theme "No, Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see all the music we use if you go to our website, that's metroconnection.org. Just click on a story and you'll find information about its accompanying song.

SHEIR

00:04:20
Also on metroconnection.org you can find our Twitter and Facebook links. You can read free transcripts of stories and if you missed part of today's show you can hear the whole thing by clicking on the this week on "Metro Connection" link. To hear our most recent episodes click the podcast link or find us on iTunes.

SHEIR

00:04:37
We hope you can join us next week when we'll be Taking Chances. We'll see what life is like in the tiny town of Chance, Md. We'll hear how folks are coping with a big spike in heroin use in Ocean City. And we'll talk with law makers enmeshed in the gun debate and find out why each side thinks the other is taking big chances when it comes to safety.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #1

00:04:57
In Maryland that view that I just expressed to you, which makes all the sense in the world to most people in America, falls on deaf ears in the General Assembly.

SHEIR

00:05:06
I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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