Transcripts

Your Letters

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:14
Before we say goodbye on this first show of the New Year, we thought we would pass the mic to you and read from your letters and emails. Jacob Fensten's recent report on D.C.'s bike lanes and the confusion their causing among drivers and cyclists prompted this note from Rachel. She writes, "I am a driver, not a biker and I have no problem with bike lanes. However, the bikers who regularly weave in and out of traffic and make the driving experience exasperating.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:41
If bikers are supposed to obey the rules of the road, they should be required to obey all rules of the road." We also heard from several cyclists in the city, one avid bike commuter writes, "I ride the L Street bike lane daily on my commute home from work. The early days were confusing, prior to the signs and paint, but three weeks later, it seems pretty smooth sailing along L Street.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:01:02
For those complaining about the loss of driving lanes, there were always parked and standing cars in the lane. Traffic couldn't flow anyway. The biggest loss is the commercial loading zones, but it seems delivery trucks have gotten the message now." Another city cyclist disagreed, writing "The L Street lanes are a mistake. The street was already overly congested with vehicular traffic. I know there are people who regularly commute by bike and I hope that they will increase, but the number will never be big enough so that bike traffic volume will justify permanently removing one-fourth of the flow of a major thoroughfare."

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:01:35
Another listener, John, wrote us to comment about a recent piece by NPR special correspondent Susan Stamberg who occasionally contributes to "Metro Connection." He writes, "I was blessed to catch two pieces by Susan Stamberg on consecutive days," he writes. "Her piece on the Roy Lichtenstein exhibit on 'Metro Connection' on Friday and her remembrance of Dave Brubeck on "Weekend Edition." I just love the smile in her voice. Thank you, Susan and WAMU, you are treasures."

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:02:01
And finally, Amy sent us a message saying she listens to "Metro Connection" "every Saturday morning as I eat breakfast and get ready to go teach swim lessons at the YMCA. As a transplant to D.C., I really feel like the stories you tell on your show make me feel more connected and tuned in, literally, to my city, home and neighborhood." Thanks so much, Amy, for making us part of your Saturday morning routine.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:02:29
If you have a comment or question about the show, you can reach us a metro@WAMU.org. Or send us a tweet, our handle is @WAMUmetro.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:03:00
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Sabri Ben-Achour, Emily Berman, Kavitha Cardoza and Martin Di Caro along with reporter Jessica Gould. WAMU's managing editor of news is Meymo Lyons. "Metro Connection's" managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Rachel Schuster. Lauren Landau, Rachel Schuster and John Hines produce "Door to Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:03:30
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts" and our "Door to Door" theme "No, Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see all the music we use on our website, metroconnection.org. Just click on an individual story and you'll find information about its accompanying song.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:03:47
Also on metroconnection.org, you can find our Twitter and Facebook links, you can read free transcripts of stories, and if you missed part of today's show, you can hear the whole thing by clicking the this week on "Metro Connection" link. To listen to our most recent episodes, click the podcast link or find us on iTunes.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:04:04
We hope you can join us next week when we'll dive head long into the New Year with a show we're calling Into The Future. We'll step inside the world of preppers, Washingtonians who spend a lot of time preparing for life's big what-ifs. We'll tour a D.C. neighborhood that's been the site of all sorts of change over the decades and is bracing for an even bigger makeover.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:04:25
And we'll take a crash course in predicting the future from a celebrated psychic in Maryland. I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news
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