Door To Door: Logan Circle And Benning Heights, D.c. (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Door To Door: Logan Circle And Benning Heights, D.C.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:07
And now, our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit Logan Circle in northwest D.C., and Benning Heights in southeast D.C.

MR. TIM CHRISTENSEN

00:00:18
My name is Tim Christensen, I’m 56 years old, and I live in the Logan Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The boundaries are K Street on the south, S Street on the north, and Ninth Street on the east, and 16th Street on the west. The population of Logan Circle probably has a higher proportion of LGBT residents than any other neighborhood in Washington, D.C. It's a very welcoming community. The era from 1968 to the 1990s, which was the peak of the crack epidemic, was very difficult in Logan Circle. Times have changed, the issues are different, people talk more about parking now than they talk about prostitution, but there are still issued that need to be dealt with, and they do draw the community together.

MR. TIM CHRISTENSEN

00:00:59
Logan Circle has a couple of icons that are worth of note. One is the beautiful statue of Gen. John Logan, which sits in the middle of Logan Circle Park. The circle was originally called Iowa Circle and was changed to Logan Circle in 1930. Another icon in Logan Circle neighborhood is, of course, the fabulous Studio Theatre, which is part of the bedrock of this community. Whether it's shopping, dry cleaning, hardware store, great dining, terrific theatre, terrific bars, everything I need is within a few blocks of my front door.

MR. BENJAMIN E. THOMAS SR.

00:01:33
My full name is Benjamin Earl Thomas, Sr., and I am 92 years old. I live in Washington, D.C. I'm in the Benning Heights area. I've been there since 1958. I live three blocks south of the Maryland line, right in the tip end of southeast Washington. I live between Benning Road and Pennsylvania Avenue. Of course, that's big Fort Dupont Park in between that area. The nearest grocery store is down on Minnesota Avenue, which is probably, I'd say three or four miles from my house, but they have a couple of corner stores.

MR. BENJAMIN E. THOMAS SR.

00:02:07
Most of the people that moved in at the same time as I did, we started buying our own homes. Most of them have sold or passed on. It's not as family friendly like it was at one time. Quite a bit has changed, and a lot of the kids that grew up, very few has come back to live in the neighborhood. I'm probably the only one in my block that sits on my porch regularly, because a lot of people there are single widows, the women that live by themselves, and they're afraid to come out. What I really like about it is that it's still a quiet neighborhood. I can sleep at night.

SHEIR

00:02:45
We heard from Tim Christensen in Logan Circle, and Benjamin Earl Thomas, Sr. of Benning Heights. Your neighborhood can be a part of "Door to Door" too. Just send an email to metro@wamu.org, or visit us on Facebook, that's facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And to see a map of all the doors we've knocked on so far, visit our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:30
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza, Rebecca Blatt, Emily Berman, and Jacob Fenston, along with reporter Jocelyn Frank. WAMU's managing editor of news is Meymo Lyons. "Metro Connection's" managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Rachel Schuster. Lauren Landau, Rachel Schuster, and John Hines produce "Door to Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

SHEIR

00:04:00
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts," and our "Door to Door" theme "No, Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see all the music we use on our website, that's metroconnection.org. Just click on a story and you'll find information about its accompanying song. Also on metroconnection.org you can find our Twitter and Facebook links, you can read free transcripts of stories, and if you missed part of today's show, you can hear the whole thing by clicking the "This Week on Metro Connection" link.

SHEIR

00:04:27
To hear our most recent episodes, click the podcast link, or find us on iTunes. We hope you can join us next week when we'll present a show we're calling Follow-Ups. You know all those "Metro Connection" stories you hear and you wonder what happened next, after the story aired? Well, next week, we'll let you know, by bringing you the long awaited second act, if you will. We'll check back in with the opera superstar whose career was nearly derailed by illness. We'll visit with kids who were struggling with obesity to see how they're faring now, and we'll get the full story of a man we heard from in our recent report on Lorton Prison, a man who's turned his life around in a major way.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #1

00:05:05
You know, I went in as a young addict, you know, out of control, and I came out as a minister, educated, with a new purposed in life.

SHEIR

00:05:15
I'm Rebecca Sheir, and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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