Transcripts

Door To Door: Springland Farm, D.C., And Pleasant Valley, Md.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:06
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit Springland Farm in Northwest D.C. and Pleasant Valley in Knoxville, Md.

MS. MARY H. GROSS

00:00:18
My name is Mary H. Gross. I was born in Pleasant Valley, the third month, 24th day, 1911 and I've lived here in Pleasant Valley all my life. I've been in this church, Mt. Moriah, for a long time. I was seeing a number of people, pastors come in here and leave and go and I'm the oldest one left now, have been coming here for about 96 years. Over here, right here was horse and buggies and the church here at that time, we didn't have an electric. We just had oil lamps, one here and one over there, one there.

MS. EDITH WEEDON

00:01:03
My name is Edith Weedon. Mary H. Gross is my mother and I live here in Pleasant Valley, Md. The reason they call it a valley because we are located between two mountain ridges, South Mountain Ridge and Elkridge. This used to be a farming community. The people made their living by farming or working on the railroad but now most of the farmers have sold their land and people have moved from the city and built homes and then they commute back and forth to their jobs.

MS. EDITH WEEDON

00:01:34
It's a nice place to live, neighborly, we treat each other with respect and that's a really important thing, you know, to live in peace.

MR. CHUCK LUDLAM

00:01:49
I'm Chuck Ludlam and I live in the Springland Farm community which most people know as North Cleveland Park but we believe it should be called the Springland Farm community. The middle of it is the Manor House of the proprietor of the Springland Farm, John Adlum, going back to around 1800 and that is on Tilden Street about one block from the intersection of Tilden and Reno and right at Springland Lane.

MR. CHUCK LUDLAM

00:02:14
John Adlum was a revolutionary war hero who came to live in the District of Columbia and he came here to establish a vineyard and he established perhaps the most important vineyard at that time in the United States and the granddaddy of vineyards in America. Until four years ago we had a member of the Adlum family still living in the community, 200 years after John Adlum first came there.

MR. CHUCK LUDLAM

00:02:39
We have found that using history really gives us a sense of our identity. It gives us a source of pride, of where our boundaries stop. We actually know where the farm was, we know the history and we know that we are part of that history and that's who we are as a community. And it's history that binds us together.

SHEIR

00:03:00
We heard from Chuck Ludlam in Springland Farm and Mary H. Gross and her daughter, Edith Weedon, in Pleasant Valley. If you think your neighborhood should be part of "Door to Door," send an email to metro@wamu.org or visit us on Facebook. That's facebook.com/metroconnection.org. and you can see a map of all the doors we've knocked on so far on our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:34
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Patrick Madden, Emily Friedman, Sabri Ben-Achour, Martin Di Caro, and Rebecca Blatt along with reporter, Kate Sheehy. Our acting news director is Meymo Lyons. Our managing producer is Tara Boyle. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Raphaella Bennin. Jonna McKone, Lauren Landau and Raphaella Bennin produce "Door to Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

SHEIR

00:04:03
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts" and our "Door to Door" theme "No, Girl," are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see all the music we use on our website, metroconnection.org. Just click on a story and you'll find information about its accompanying song.

SHEIR

00:04:19
Also on metroconnection.org you can find our Twitter link, our Facebook link, you can read free transcripts of stories and if you missed part of today's show you can hear the whole thing by clicking the this week on "Metro Connection" link. To hear our most recent episodes, click the podcast link or find us on iTunes. We hope you can join us next week when we'll hit the books with a show on learning. We'll explore the uber-competitive admissions process at some of our regions private schools and hear how D.C. Public Schools are changing how they teach phys-ed.

SHEIR

00:04:49
Plus, tourist farmers. We'll explore the lengths some people will go to learn how to work the land.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE 1

00:04:56
We're learning how to take care of animals and identifying weeds, simple things like that because I'm very new at this, so some of the very basics really.

SHEIR

00:05:04
I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
Transcripts of WAMU programs are available for personal use. Transcripts are provided "As Is" without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. WAMU does not warrant that the transcript is error-free. For all WAMU programs, the broadcast audio should be considered the authoritative version. Transcripts are owned by WAMU 88.5 FM American University Radio and are protected by laws in both the United States and international law. You may not sell or modify transcripts or reproduce, display, distribute, or otherwise use the transcript, in whole or in part, in any way for any public or commercial purpose without the express written permission of WAMU. All requests for uses beyond personal and noncommercial use should be referred to (202) 885-1200.