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This Week On Metro Connection: Then And Now

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From the Re-envisioning Washington D.C. series…  Ford's Theater, Washington DC then and now. Archival digitized glass negative source: Library of Congress LC-BH835- 21
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From the Re-envisioning Washington D.C. series… Ford's Theater, Washington DC then and now. Archival digitized glass negative source: Library of Congress LC-BH835- 21

With the languid, lazy days of summer almost over, we'll bring you a show all about the passage of time. We'll dip in to the Metro Connection archives and meet a woman who's been something of a piano prodigy for more than 90 years. We'll join a local scientist in Panama, to find out what sorts of frogs used to live in the jungles there — and what's being done now to prevent their rapid disappearance. And we'll visit a pilgrimage site held sacred by the Piscataway nation of Native Americans.


[Music: "Every Little Bit Hurts" by John Davis from Title Tracks]

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