Door To Door (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

Door To Door: Capitol Hill, D.C. And Elkridge, Md.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:10
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit D.C.'s Capitol Hill and Elkridge, Md.

MR. TOMMY WELLS

00:00:18
I'm Tommy Wells. I'm the city councilman for Ward 6 and I live on Capitol Hill. I'm 55 years old and I've lived here since 1983. When I was first here, at least the residential part of the Hill, really didn't go past 9th or 10th Street. And now, of course, the Hill is considered to go all the way to the Anacostia River, which is 19th and 20th Street. It used to only go far north as 8th Street but now we have something called Near Northeast Hill. So the Hill has technically gotten quite large.

MR. TOMMY WELLS

00:00:48
After White Flight in the '50s, the Hill in the area was predominantly African American with the kind of ethnic pockets that you can still kind of see. As time went on then the Hill gentrified. I think the first wave of gentrification must've been in the late '70s and then things got very dangerous and the city went broke in the late 80s and early 90s. I think from the mid-'90s on the city or at least Capitol Hill really changed.

MR. TOMMY WELLS

00:01:14
There's still a sense of that small neighborhood on Capitol Hill where it's kind of like its own town or own village. There's people that have been many years so there is a continuity of history of people that kind of remember how things were and also the old stores. Our Fourth of July parade is probably one of the most quaint American parades. It could be in small town Nebraska that except for, you know, anybody's child, anybody's dog, everybody walks in the parade and it's just like any other small town in America and that's really what Capitol Hill is.

MR. DAN WECKER

00:01:58
My name is Daniel Wecker. I'm the execute chef and owner of the Elkridge Furnace Inn and I live in Elkridge, Md. I'm 53 years old. Elkridge is located midway between Baltimore and Washington. The name Elkridge comes from the early colonists being here. This area used to be covered with herds of elk. Elkridge Landing was the largest seaport north of Annapolis in colonial times and the ships used to come here from Great Britain.

MR. DAN WECKER

00:02:26
And on the north side of the river the ships used to come here to get hogsheads of tobacco down Rowling Road, which ended here in Elkridge. Elkridge has changed dramatically in the last 23 years since I've been here. It really has grown up as a community from something that was more industrial to a little more cosmopolitan in terms of its role as a suburb. There's been a lot of new housing, lot of new families. The schools have improved, the community has, I think, found a new sense of itself and there's a lot of pride in the Elkridge community.

SHEIR

00:03:02
We heard from D.C. Council member Tommy Wells in Capitol Hill and Daniel Wecker in Elkridge. If you think your neighborhood should be part of "Door to Door," send an email to metro@wamu.org or visit us on Facebook. That's facebook.com/metroconnection.org and to look at a map of all the doors we've knocked so far, visit our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:32
Up next, an unstable lover, a marriage gone sour and an architect who helped bring about D.C.'s Building Height restriction. What do these things have in common? We'll get the scoop on our monthly series, "The Location."

MS. KIM BENDER

00:03:45
We're still talking about one part of his history today, but we've forgotten all about the rest, which I think is a little juicier.

SHEIR

00:03:52
And we'll imagine life for a family of four in a single room D.C. alley dwelling.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE ONE

00:03:57
I think I feel a lot more comfortable with my parents and a lot more connected with them because we live in such a close space and we're around each other all the time.

SHEIR

00:04:06
It's coming your way on "Metro Connection." Here on WAMU 88.5.
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