Door To Door (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Door To Door: Petworth, D.C.

MR. SABRI BEN-ACHOUR

00:00:04
And now, our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we bring you stories from our taping last week at Petworth Library and go back in time to learn more about the history of this Northwest D.C. neighborhood.

MS. JUDITH JUDSON

00:00:17
My name is Judith Judson. I'm going to talk about the Petworth area during World War II and immediately thereafter. My family moved here in 1942 because my father got a job at the office of Price Administration. Housing was extremely scarce in D.C. because everybody had come here for jobs. We got one of those little scrunchy houses at Fifth and Ingraham Streets. We were glad to get it because of the housing shortage.

MS. JUDITH JUDSON

00:00:51
At the corner, up at Kennedy and Fifth, was a dime store on one side and, I think, a gas station. It didn't get much during the war of course and farther down was the most important shop in the neighborhood which was the Betty Mae Ice Cream Parlor. Everybody called it Jones'. It was family-owned and it made superb homemade ice cream. You could get a 15 cent milkshake that you could stand your straw up in it, it was so thick.

MS. JUDITH JUDSON

00:01:22
Outdoors was opened to the kids. We didn't have any supervision. There wasn't any need for it and the back alley system was amazing. They were clean, immaculately clean and so you could go and play in the back alleys and nobody would pester you.

MS. JUDITH JUDSON

00:01:42
It's so strange because, of course, everything is the same and yet everything is different. The whole world has changed since then. Everything, you know, is gone.

MS. GRACE YANG

00:01:57
My name is Grace Yang (sp?). I lived in this neighborhood for 69 years. My father opened up a restaurant in this neighborhood because there weren't too many Chinese restaurants back then in the 1930s, late '30s and he thought maybe, you know, it might make a prosperous venture here.

MS. GRACE YANG

00:02:22
There was one other Chinese family on Ninth, between Taylor and Upsure, and she had, I think, three daughters and, I think, a daughter in China. I guess it was in the late '80s, early '90s, mid '90s, there was shooting and drug dealings and whatnot. You know, the neighborhood has changed. There's more of these young couples that moved into the neighborhood and then they built that playground, made it safe for children so that's nice.

BEN-ACHOUR

00:02:56
We heard from Judith Judson and Grace Yang in D.C.'s Petworth neighborhood. If you think your neighborhood should be part of "Door to Door," just send an email to metro@wamu.org or visit us on Facebook. That's facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And to see a map of all doors we've knocked on so far, visit our website, metroconnection.org.

BEN-ACHOUR

00:03:39
And that's "Metro's Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Jessica Gould, Martin DiCaro and Kavitha Cardoza along with reporter Marc Adams. Our acting news director is Meymo Lyons. Tara Boyle is our managing producer. Lauren Landau is our editorial assistant. Our intern is Alex Patlis. Jonna McKone, Lauren Landau, Heather Taylor and Alex Patlis produce "Door To Door." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

BEN-ACHOUR

00:04:16
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts,'' and our ''Door To Door'' theme "No Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see all the music we use on our website, metroconnection.org. Just click on an individual story and you'll find information about its accompanying song. Also on metroconnection.org, you can find our Twitter and Facebook links. You can read free transcripts of stories and if you've missed part of today's show or just want to listen to any of our recent shows, you can click the podcast link up at the top of the page.

BEN-ACHOUR

00:04:48
You also can sign up for our podcasts on iTunes. We hope you'll join us next week when we'll be playing games. We'll meet a Maryland woman who created a board game to teach her children about their African roots and believe or not, it's becoming so successful that she actually is supporting her family with its sales. We'll also go inside Virginia's political blood sport over transportation funding and preview a new Smithsonian exhibit about video games. Plus a play within a play about the Russian mystic, Rasputin.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE ONE

00:05:15
If you know anything about Rasputin's history, he goes through a lot and so I get shot, I get dismembered, I get drowned...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE ONE

00:05:24
Poisoned.

ONE

00:05:25
Yes, poisoned. I'm so sorry to forget about the poisoning. But all sorts of wonderful and challenging things to play.

BEN-ACHOUR

00:05:30
I'm Sabri Ben-Achour and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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