Gauging The Health Of The District's Schools | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Metro Connection

Filed Under:

Gauging The Health Of The District's Schools

Play associated audio
D.C. school officials have a new plan to evaluate the performance of the city's charter schools.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cocoen/411960476/
D.C. school officials have a new plan to evaluate the performance of the city's charter schools.

The latest results from the Nation's Report Card, a federal education study conducted every two years, have been released. And what's most striking in this year's findings is the large achievement gap between black and white students in D.C.'s public schools. The District's schools ranked the highest compared to other urban school districts, including Baltimore, New York and Philadelphia. WAMU education reporter Kavitha Cardoza talked to Metro Connection's Rebecca Sheir about the results. Following are highlights of their conversation.

Cardoza on why the District's achievement gap is so much higher than that of other cities: "I spoke with Michael Casserly with Council of the Great City Schools. He says this is definitely an issue city leaders need to address. But he says it's also not as simple as comparing a white score to a black score because it's also about income."

Cardoza on how D.C. students did this year, compared to the last time they were tested: "Sort of one step forward, one step backward. D.C.'s fourth and eighth graders improved slightly in math but their scores went down slightly in reading. And it's worth noting that charter schools aren't included in the study even though approximately 40 percent of children in the District attend charter schools."

Cardoza on how D.C. charters schools are doing under a new a three-tier system based on a 100-point scale: "Thirty percent of the schools received between 65 to 100 points and are considered the best charter schools in the District. Approximately half the schools fell into the second category, of 35 to 64 points, which means they met minimum overall standards. The lowest 20 percent are in the third tier, meaning they received 34 points and below. Four schools in that category received fewer than 20 points, which means the board may close them at the end of this academic year."

Listen to the full interview.

[Music: "Not the Doctor (in the Style of Alanis Morrissette)" by Hot Fox Karaoke from Hot Fox Karaoke - Alanis Morrissette]

NPR

Kids' Films And Stories Share A Dark Theme: Dead Mothers

Why do so many animated movies star motherless kids? Sarah Boxer, a graphic novelist, cartoon-lover and mother, talks to NPR's Kelly McEvers about the phenomenon and the message it sends to children.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Will Become Of Obama's Request For Immigration Relief Funds?

NPR's Arun Rath talks to political correspondent Mara Liasson about the chances of a political agreement over how to handle the migration of thousands of Central American children.
NPR

Looking For Free Sperm, Women May Turn To Online Forums

Bypassing commercial sperm banks, thousands are logging on to websites where women can connect with men at no cost. Anecdotes abound, but the scope of the unregulated activity is unclear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.