Door To Door (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Door To Door: Foxhall Village, D.C. And Pimmit Hills, Va.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:07
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door To Door," we visit Foxhall Village in Northwest D.C. and Pimmit Hills, Va.

MS. CINDY KWITCHOFF

00:00:18
My name is Cindy Kwitchoff. I'm 45 years old and I live in Pimmit Hills, Va. I moved to Pimmit Hills in 1998. It’s right inside the beltway. It borders Route 7 and Route 123. Officially, we're part of Falls Church, but essentially because Tyson's Corner is becoming a major city in itself, we are right there at the border of Tyson's Corner and so now people are actually calling us the Tyson's Corner area.

MS. CINDY KWITCHOFF

00:00:45
Pimmit Hills used to be a farmers' field and this was all country way back when. And in the 1950s, late 1940s, a big subdivision was built on the farmers field. And at the time it was one of the largest subdivisions in Fairfax County. The population of Pimmit Hills is about 6,000 even though we're surrounded by cities and major roads it's still a community where the trees are very large and mature and it's a great place to walk around and walk a dog or jog around and people are friendly. They say hi to you when you walk by and it's just a nice place to live.

MR. PAUL DONZITTO

00:01:29
I'm Paul Donzitto (sp?). I'm a lifelong D.C. resident, in fact, I'm a third-generation D.C. resident. My family and I moved to Foxhall Village in early 2002. Foxhall Village is a little area of the city nestled close to the Potomac River, between Georgetown and Palisades. It’s a neighborhood with about 400 houses. Most of it was built in the early to mid-1920s. It was one of the first planned communities in -- not only in Washington D.C., but in America.

MR. PAUL DONZITTO

00:01:58
There's such an architectural consistency throughout Foxhall Village that even if one, two or three houses per block were significantly altered, the entire architectural fabric of the community would really be decimated. The neighborhood was at least loosely based on the houses built in the 16th and 17th century in Tewkesbury, which is in the West Country in England. Much of the residential architecture in Tewkesbury had been demolished in the late 1960s and 1970s. So in many ways the neighborhood of Foxhall Village is really all that remains of the original city that inspired it.

SHEIR

00:02:36
We heard from Paul Donzitto in Foxhall Village and Cindy Kwitchoff in Pimmit Hills. If you'd like to share the story of your neighborhood join us this Saturday afternoon at the Watha T. Daniel Shaw Library in Northwest D.C. between 1:00 and 5:00 you can come on over and record your story. To reserve a time slot, go to wamu.org/events.

SHEIR

00:03:13
After the break, moderating what you put on your dinner plate.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE

00:03:17
It's not really about changing our minds. It's just more about aligning our own behavior with the ethical values that we already hold.

SHEIR

00:03:25
It's just ahead on "Metro Connection," here on WAMU 88.5.
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