Transcripts

Door To Door: Hyattsville, Md. & Lansdowne, Va. (Rebroadcast)

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:09
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door to Door," we visit Hyattsville, Md. and Lansdowne, Va.

MS. DEBBIE FRANKLIN

00:00:18
I'm Debbie Franklin, I'm 55 and I've lived in the city of Hyattsville, Md. for 23 years. The community of Hyattsville attracted people who wanted a year round home, outside of the city. Hyattsville grew up along the B & O Railroad and U.S. Route 1. People often think of this very amorphous area, Northern Prince George's County, but it's actually an incorporated city that's less than three square miles.

MS. DEBBIE FRANKLIN

00:00:43
Initially, it felt like a sleepy little suburb. But it feels more and more urban. I find that with each passing year, it feels more and more vibrant. People are discovering us, not only as a convenient location in the city but as a destination. With a redevelopment along U.S. Route 1 and its designation as an arts district, I think, more energy is coming to the community. It's a very friendly community. I mean, I think the sidewalks and alleys actually encourage people to get out and walk and know their neighbors, if not by name at least to recognize and say hello.

MS. DEBBIE FRANKLIN

00:01:18
The first thing my neighbor said to me when I moved in was, don't ever hesitate to ask for a cup of sugar. It is a place that I've called home for 23 years and hope to call home for many more.

MR. JOHN WHITBECK

00:01:33
My name is John Whitbeck. I am 35 years old and I live in Lansdowne, Va. Lansdowne is an un-corporated part of Louden County. It's in between Ashburn and the town of Leesburg. It's on the northern side of Route 7 right along the Potomac River. Lansdowne's history is actually pretty interesting. The land was a part of the Xerox Document University, which is now the National Conference Center.

MR. JOHN WHITBECK

00:01:58
When Lansdowne was first developed, the land was sold to various developers from Xerox, itself. I think, it was built really, to be an empty nester community. And interestingly enough, we've had to add tot lots and other family friendly things because I don't think the developer anticipated how much it would be catering to young families.

MR. JOHN WHITBECK

00:02:18
It's middle class, upper middle class community. But you have a good mix of different religions, different races, different backgrounds, people from all over the country. And we have about 2,200 homes in the community. So roughly, you know, 6,000 to 7,000 people total. I just never thought that we would move into a place that would have so many great people and so many great families. And we're just really blessed to have had that experience.

SHEIR

00:02:43
We heard from John Whitbeck in Lansdowne, Va. and Debbie Franklin in Hyattsville, Md. If you'd like us to feature your neighborhood on "Door to Door," send us an email at metro@wamu.org, or visit us on Facebook, that's Facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And to surf around an interactive map of all the doors we've knocked on so far, visit our website metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:07
Time now for a quick break. But when we get back, does eating local necessarily mean eating healthy?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE SPEAKER

00:03:15
The cheese is a lot more interesting and I would spend the same amount of money buying just, like, a block of cheddar cheese at Safeway as I would buying - maybe not as much cheese here, but it's a lot better.

SHEIR

00:03:26
That and more in just a minute here on "Metro Connection" here on WAMU 88.5.
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