Door-To-Door (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

Door to Door: Crystal City, VA and Brookland, D.C.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

00:00:09
And now our weekly trip around the region. On today's "Door To Door," we visit the Brookland neighborhood of Northeast D.C., then we head to Crystal City, Va.

MS. ROSIE DEMPSEY

00:00:18
My name is Rosie Dempsey. I'm 53 years old and I live in Brookland, a neighborhood in Northeast Washington D.C. What is traditionally called Brookland is defined by Michigan Avenue, South Dakota, Rhode Island Avenue and the railroad tracks.

MS. ROSIE DEMPSEY

00:00:36
Brookland has always been integrated from its very earliest days and the neighborhood was always known for its Italian-Americans, Irish-Americans, first generation. Always been known for its African-American community here, both elite, middle class, working class. Today, that's still the case. We have some really interesting institutions around which we can meet as neighbors.

MS. ROSIE DEMPSEY

00:01:07
The Franciscan monastery gives, I think, six to eight months out of the year has a spaghetti dinner where you can go for dinner for $7. My favorite part about living in Brookland, frankly, are the friends I've made here. Friends who are my neighbors, friends who I've met at the Optimism Nightclub, friends who I know because of working on civic projects with them. Friends who I've met at the drugstore, at restaurants, through other friends and I love being in a community that I feel that is a real community.

MR. CHRISTER AHL

00:01:52
I'm Christer Ahl and I'm resident in Crystal City, one of the Virginia suburbs. I've been 35 years in Washington D.C. area where I came because of the job. I'm originally from Sweden.

MR. CHRISTER AHL

00:02:08
We had lots of oil factories and a lot of open space then back in the '70s and '80s. There was an interest in making use of the area for both residential and office buildings. One of the first buildings that were put up here, a residential building, got known for an unusually large chandelier hanging in the lobby. Soon that building became known, apart from its street address, as Crystal House. All the new buildings that were put up, they were named Crystal something and gradually the whole neighborhood became used as Crystal City.

MR. CHRISTER AHL

00:02:44
If you look around today, most buildings are not taller than 10, 12 stories and there is now permission that for buildings to become twice as tall so that you could have more of a situation where people can both work and live in Crystal City. It's inconceivable that this prime location would be remaining so (unintelligible) city.

SHEIR

00:03:06
We heard from Rosie Dempsey in Brookland and Christer Ahl in Crystal City. If you'd like us to feature your community on "Door To Door," send us an email at metro@wamu.org or visit us on our Facebook page, that's facebook.com/metroconnection.org. And if you want to surf around an interactive map of all the doors we've knocked on so far, you can find that on our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:03:48
And that's Metro's connection for this week. We heard from WAMU's Sabri Ben-Achour, Bryan Russo, Emily Friedman and Jim Hilgen along with reporter Alice Ollstein. Jim Asendio is our news director. Our managing producer is Tara Boyle. Jonna McKone and Peter Domingos produce "Door To Door." Thanks as always to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

SHEIR

00:04:15
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts'' and our ''Door To Door'' theme "No Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see a list of all the music we use on our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

00:04:28
And while you're there, you can find us on Twitter, you can like us on Facebook. You can subscribe to the weekly "Metro Connection" podcasts and you can read and print out free transcripts of all the stories on the show. We hope you can join us next week when we'll look into legacies. We'll talk with a Silver Spring resident about his own personal legacy as the 96-year-old owner of a neighborhood dry-cleaning business and we'll explore a new theatrical project in Washington that puts Abraham Lincoln's legacy in the spotlight.

SHEIR

00:04:58
And looking ahead just a few more weeks, we're working on our annual "Haunted Washington Show" we'll be airing the week before Halloween, so if you have any spooky spine-chilling or supernatural story ideas you'd like to share with us, we're all ears. Just send an e-mail to metro@wamu.org. I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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