Your Letters (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Your Letters

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:54:57
We wrap up today's back to school edition with "Your Letters." Our wildcard show featured a story by environment reporter, Sabri Ben-Achour, who traveled to Panama to explore frog fungus and the local scientists hoping to wipe it out. The segment prompted this message from our listener, Claude.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:55:14
"I just heard the excellent report by Sabri Ben-Achour on the plight of global amphibians and the scourge of Chytrid. Mr. Ben-Achour's report made the story very accessible and relevant and I found it fascinating. Super job, keep up the excellent work."

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:55:28
On last week's Migration show, we featured an interview with U.S. Congressman, Jim Moran of Virginia. He wants to create a museum in D.C. dedicated to the history of American Immigration. The segment prompted a range of responses. First, this one from Linda, who says, "I like it. It goes hand-in-hand with the growing interest in genealogy in America." Meanwhile, Katie says, "Not a bad idea, but not on the Mall, please. The area is getting horribly overcrowded while other neighborhoods languish. Find an immigrant neighborhood and put it there."

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:55:59
Well, a side note on the museum's proposed location. The latest plan is to build it around the Banneker Overlook right near L'Enfant Plaza and a stone's throw from the Mall, not technically on the Mall itself. And finally, last week's show also featured a story on an Ethiopian-Jamaican restaurant featuring a traditional Caribbean known as Bake and Shark.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:56:20
In response, we received this note from Ray in Leesburg, Va. "I found your segment on different cultures in D.C. and on restaurants very interesting. However, due to the worldwide depletion of sharks, the part about having a shark sandwich only encourages more of these harmful practices. It is hypocritical to say to China that killing sharks for their fins is wrong when in the nation's capital, sharks are served at local restaurants."

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:56:46
Do you have a comment or question about "Metro Connection?" If so, we're all ears. You can send us an email at metro@wamu.org or head to our website, metroconnection.org, and click on the Facebook or Twitter link.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:57:17
And that's "Metro's Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's Sabri Ben-Achour and Kavitha Cardoza along with Alice Ollstein and NPR's Susan Stamberg. Our news director is Jim Asendio. Our managing producer is Tara Boyle. Jonna McKone and Lauren Landau produce, "Door To Door." Marc Adams produces "D.C. Gigs." Thanks, as always, to the WAMU engineering and digital media teams for their help with production and the "Metro Connection" website.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:57:44
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts'' and our ''Door To Door'' theme "No Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. You can see a list of all the music we use on our website, that's metroconnection.org.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:57:57
And while you're there, you can find us on Twitter, you can like us on Facebook and you also can subscribe to the free "Metro Connection" podcasts. We're taking a bit of a holiday next week, but we'll be back September 2nd and 3rd, Labor Day Weekend, with a show all about, yes, labor. We'll look at a job that's not for the weak of stomach and at another that's a throwback to colonial times. Plus, why our region's film industry is booming and a program in D.C. that's turning troubled teens into barbers.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE SPEAKER

13:58:10
Usually you get your first haircut when you're about two or three years old. So you're not going to know what they're talking about. All you can sense is spirit. It's always been positive. It's a sense of togetherness.

SHEIR

13:58:38
I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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