Running The Extra Mile...25: The Dojo Of Pain (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

Running the Extra Mile... or 25: The Dojo of Pain

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:52:53
If gazing up at the stars sounds, well, a little bit too laid back, we have an alternative for all you overachievers out there. It's called the Dojo of Pain, a competitive running group that gathers at Hains Point every morning at 6:00 for grueling 24-mile runs. Kavitha Cardoza met up with members of the dojo and brings us this audio postcard.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #1

13:53:18
Well, I tell people we call ourselves a Dojo of Pain because Dojo of Fun was already taken.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #2

13:53:23
It's not uncommon to have a 10 or 12-hour workday and it's not uncommon in my job to travel all over the world and it's actually one of the things that makes running ideal.

#1

13:53:34
It's simple, don't need to spend a lot of money on gear or anything like that.

#2

13:53:37
We run in the snow, we run on the ice.

#1

13:53:40
I once heard someone say, you know, did you eat today? Did you sleep today? Did you breathe today? Then why didn't you train today? And that's kind of the ethos of this group.

#1

13:53:50
These guys are some of my best friends, but a big part of what I get out of this group is every day we're out here I'm doing my best to try to beat them. The first year I was running with these guys what happened was we would do these gut busting workouts.

#1

13:54:02
We'd be doing 14 miles of really hard training and then later that night I would be going out and I'd be running, like, seven or eight more miles. And I wouldn't tell anybody I was actually running the seven or eight more miles either.

#1

13:54:13
I didn't want them to know that I was, like, getting in these extra workouts. But I must be kind of like losing my edge because last year I told everybody that that's what I had been doing the whole time.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #3

13:54:25
As you keep going, eventually the goal is kind of get your body in like a state of distress.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE #4

13:54:31
When I first started, I was what they call a hobby jogger and I went into a race without a lot of training and that was extreme pain. But I guess I'm somewhat of a masochist so I went back for more.

#1

13:54:44
The huge part of distance running is learning to endure suffering. Right. I mean, it's sort of -- maybe it's Buddhist that way in a way. A race is basically a test of who is willing to hurt more and hurt longer.

#4

13:54:59
You just try to find mental tricks to make the pain stay away as long as possible.

#2

13:55:03
Running training is a little like a large biological experiment.

#1

13:55:07
I feel, I guess, dizzy and nauseous and really tired.

#2

13:55:13
I feel great. It's like the best of coffee you can imagine.

#3

13:55:16
I actually think it helps me with the office. I think I've, you know, been out running and gotten some sunshine, it's a lot easier to sit still at my desk.

#1

13:55:25
This helps us relieve stress in a lot of ways. Sometimes you get so tired from this it sort of numbs you to the stress of everyday life.

#2

13:55:33
It's thrilling. It's the greatest -- it's the greatest physical high that's out there and the more effort you put in, the better it feels in some ways. In some ways, the worse it feels.

SHEIR

13:55:49
That was Daniel Yi, Richard Rainey, Brian Savitch, Jeff King and P.J. Martinez. All members of the Dojo of Pain. You can see photos of the runners and to find out if you've got what it takes to join the dojo, go to our website, metroconnection.org.

SHEIR

13:56:56
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's David Schultz, Sabri Ben-Achour, Kavitha Cardoza and Bryan Russo, along with reporter Emily Friedman. Jim Asendio is our news director. Our managing producer is Tara Boyle. Jonna McKone and Lauren Landau produce "Door to Door." Thanks to Tobey Schreiner, Jonathon Charry, Andrew Chadwick, Margo Kelly, Timmy Olmsted and Kelin Quigley for their production help and to the WAMU digital media team for keeping our website up to date.

SHEIR

13:57:23
Our theme song "Every Little Bit Hurts" and our "Door to Door" theme "No Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings record company. Visit our website, metroconnection.org for a list of all the music we use and while you're there, you can sign up for our Twitter feed, join our Facebook community. You also can subscribe to the free weekly "Metro Connection" podcast so you can take us with you wherever you go.

SHEIR

13:57:46
We hope you can join us next Friday afternoon at 1:00 and Saturday morning at 7:00 when we bring you a brand spanking new show about preserving and conserving our region's history, from the pulpit, to the battlefield, to the U.S. House of Representatives. Plus, the secret core of workers who restore priceless paintings at the national gallery of art.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE

13:58:07
You have to sort of be humble, in a way. There are some in the field who've felt that really good artists don't make good restorers because they may be a little bit too free in rearranging what they don't like. We are technicians. We're not artists.

SHEIR

13:58:22
I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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