From A to B: Metro's Image, Two Years After the Crash | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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From A to B: Metro's Image, Two Years After the Crash

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City and Metro officials, as well as families of those who lost their lives in the June 22nd 2009 crash, participated in a wreath-laying ceremony near the crash site, to mark the two-year anniversary.
Pete Thompson
City and Metro officials, as well as families of those who lost their lives in the June 22nd 2009 crash, participated in a wreath-laying ceremony near the crash site, to mark the two-year anniversary.

It's been two years since the deadly Red Line train crash near Fort Totten. Many observers of Metro say the transit agency has made huge strides in improving safety since then, yet antipathy among riders is still very high. In our weekly transportation segment, WAMU transportation reporter David Schultz talks with Rebecca Sheir about the message Metro is hoping to convey to improve its image.

Note: For our upcoming "Mysteries, Puzzles and Enigmas" show, we're answering your questions about transportation in the D.C. region. Contact us.

[Music: "Pay Attention" by Bexar Bexar from Haralambos]

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