Spinning in Two Political Worlds: D.C. & Congress | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Spinning in Two Political Worlds: D.C. & Congress

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This electronic billboard outside DC City Council headquarters lists the amount of federal taxes paid by District residents while not having a vote in U.S. Congress. (pictured here: WAMU DC reporter Patrick Madden)
Rebecca Sheir
This electronic billboard outside DC City Council headquarters lists the amount of federal taxes paid by District residents while not having a vote in U.S. Congress. (pictured here: WAMU DC reporter Patrick Madden)

The Wilson Building (headquarters for the D.C. City Council) and the Capitol Building are practically neighbors. But these two political worlds spin in very different orbits, despite the efforts of city leaders to win more autonomy for the District. Rebecca Sheir visits the Wilson Building with WAMU's Patrick Madden, to discuss the sources of the tension between Congress and the city, and whether there's the potential for a rapprochement in the future.

[Music: "The District Sleeps Alone Tonight" by The Postal Service from Give Up]

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