The Feds & Our Food: "What's Cooking, Uncle Sam?" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The Feds & Our Food: "What's Cooking, Uncle Sam?"

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Letter from Acting Secretary of State Robert Bacon to U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom Whitelaw Reid Discussing Postcards Regarding the Chicago Meatpacking Industry, 10/09/1907.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/5589174383
Letter from Acting Secretary of State Robert Bacon to U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom Whitelaw Reid Discussing Postcards Regarding the Chicago Meatpacking Industry, 10/09/1907.

The federal government has long been involved in what we eat. It sent food explorers to the farthest regions of the globe in search of new crops, and was encouraging healthy eating long before the creation of the now-obsolete food pyramid. The National Archives is exploring this little-discussed piece of U.S. history with the exhibit "What's Cooking, Uncle Sam?" Sabri Ben-Achour visits the Archives for a sneak peek.

[Music: "Sing For Your Supper" by Benny Goodman from Smoke House Rhythm]

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