Remembering Hazel Dickens (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Remembering Hazel Dickens

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:55:15
Before we say goodbye, a bit of sad news. The local Bluegrass community is mourning the loss of Hazel Dickens, who died last week at the age of 75. Dickens grew up poor in the mountains of West Virginia, the eighth of eleven children. And she didn't shy away from tough topics.

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:55:35
She sang about poverty, the plight of coal miners and she was described as the social conscience of bluegrass. Dickens recently spoke with "Metro Connection" in what was believed to be her last interview and she explained the role music played in her West Virginia community.

MS. HAZEL DICKENS

13:55:51
Some of the women would cook and you would gather there to eat and they would sing and talk scriptures and then the brothers and sisters would just get together and sing. A lot of times they had no instrument and that way, on their own, they learned how to sing harmony and nobody taught them.

MS. HAZEL DICKENS

13:56:23
Well, I've had people ask me how to write a song. I usually try to be totally alone. I'll go in the room and shut the door and I don't want any interference and that's when, I believe, you did your best when you go to that place within you.

SHEIR

13:56:50
That was country and bluegrass singer, Hazel Dickens. Earlier this month, she received the Washington Monument Award for Lifetime Achievement at the D.C. Bluegrass Festival. Dickens died last week at the age of 75.

SHEIR

13:57:18
And that's "Metro Connection" for this week. We heard from WAMU's David Schultz, Kavitha Cardoza and Sabri Ben-Achour and from reporters Emily Friedman and Sam Sessa. Jim Acendio is our news director. Our managing producer is Tara Boyle.

SHEIR

13:57:33
Thanks to Tobey Schreiner, Jonathon Charry, Andrew Chadwick, Margo Kelly, Timmy Olmstead, Kelin Quigley and Andrew Hiller for their production help. And to Dana Farrington and the WAMU digital media team for keeping our website up-to-date.

SHEIR

13:57:46
Our theme song, ''Every Little Bit Hurts'' and our ''Door To Door'' theme "No Girl" are from the album "Title Tracks" by John Davis and used with permission of the Ernest Jennings Record Company. Visit our website, metroconnection.org, for a list of all the music we use.

SHEIR

13:57:59
And while you're there, you can find links to our Facebook page and our Twitter feed. You can subscribe to our free weekly podcasts and you can send an e-mail by clicking the contact link. We hope you can join us next Friday afternoon at 1:00 and Saturday morning at 7:00 when we get by and get ahead. We'll hear how D.C. artists get by in one of the country's most expensive cities. And go for an early morning run with the dojo of pain. Plus, how parents are trying to help their children get ahead academically at a rather tender age.

FEMALE 1

13:58:30
It was definitely a little intimidating to be filling out a four or five page application and my husband and I thought we were reapplying to law school when we did it.

SHEIR

13:58:38
I'm Rebecca Sheir and thanks for listening to "Metro Connection," a production of WAMU 88.5 news.
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