This Week On Metro Connection: Identity (Transcript) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Transcripts

This Week On Metro Connection: Identity

MS. REBECCA SHEIR

13:06:40
I'm Rebecca Sheir.

MR. ROB SACHS

13:06:41
And I'm Rob Sachs.

SHEIR

13:06:43
And welcome to "Metro Connection." This week, we're talking identity and when it comes to identity, you've got all kinds, right? You've got your personal identity.

SACHS

13:06:50
Things like gender, sexual orientation, personality...

SHEIR

13:06:53
You've got group identity.

SACHS

13:06:54
Religion, culture, political affiliation, national identity...

SHEIR

13:06:58
And then, of course, places have an identity, too, like, say, Washington D.C.?

SACHS

13:07:02
You mean the city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm?

SHEIR

13:07:06
Or so said President John F. Kennedy. But through the years, plenty of people have tried to capture D.C.'s identity in words and not always in the most flattering way, right?

SACHS

13:07:16
Right, take President Andrew Johnson.

SHEIR

13:07:18
Washington D.C. is 12 square miles bordered by reality.

SACHS

13:07:23
Or President Harry Truman?

SHEIR

13:07:24
If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog.

SACHS

13:07:27
And then we have Charles Dickens.

SHEIR

13:07:29
It is sometimes called The City of Magnificent Distances, but it might, with greater propriety, be termed the The City of Magnificent Intentions.

SACHS

13:07:36
And finally, Mark Twain.

SHEIR

13:07:37
There is something good and motherly about Washington, the grand old benevolent national asylum for the helpless.

SACHS

13:07:46
We wanted to know how you, our faithful listeners, would describe D.C.'s identity using just three words. So we put a call out on Facebook, Twitter and WAMU's online community forum, The Conversation.

SHEIR

13:07:57
We happen to have a list of your responses right here so -- I don't know, Rob. Do you want to get us started by reading a couple?

SACHS

13:08:03
All right. Let's see here. "Smart, passionate, serious." "Warm, international, happening."

SHEIR

13:08:11
Ah-ha.

SACHS

13:08:11
And "weather, never, right."

SHEIR

13:08:14
"Weather, never, right." How about this one? "Not, so, Southern," or "diverse, political, congested." "Congested, as in traffic," this listener writes.

SACHS

13:08:24
Oh, okay.

SHEIR

13:08:26
Although during allergy season sinus congestion comes to mind. Then another listener offered up, "where, is, it?" Okay here, a whole list of three-word combos. Let me just go down and look at a couple. "Pros, and, Joes." "Food, art, politics." "Grownup, Greek, life," and "you, know, who."

SACHS

13:08:47
Hum, it sounds like a haiku there.

SACHS

13:08:50
And finally, here's an offering from another listener. "One, word, blackberry."

SHEIR

13:08:54
I can so relate to that. So anyhow, as you can see, D.C. is different things to different people, all of whom are working and playing in the DMV and holding on to their own identities. And we hear from a bunch of those people in the next hour.

SACHS

13:09:07
We'll meet a group who are living out Jules Verne's dreams of a world powered by steam and hear about a DJ who left his Southern roots for D.C.'s hard rock scene.

SHEIR

13:09:15
We'll find out what it takes to call yourself a true Baltimore Hon and learn why Washington D.C. is one of the riskiest cities when it comes to protecting your identity online.

SACHS

13:09:26
And we'll try to identify the mysterious booms that have been rattling a Maryland community since the late 1990s.
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