WAMU 88.5 : Lean & Hungry Theater

Lean & Hungry Theater: Hamlet

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Star Brandon Harris, left, Assistant Stage Manager Sarah Cumbie and Managing Director Alex Zavistovick, right, rehearse their production of Hamlet.
Lean & Hungry
Star Brandon Harris, left, Assistant Stage Manager Sarah Cumbie and Managing Director Alex Zavistovick, right, rehearse their production of Hamlet.

Lean and Hungry Theater presents its adaption of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.” This version of the play is set in plantation era South Carolina in the 1800s. The ethnically diverse cast of “Hamlet” includes Patricia Dugueye as Horatio; Azania Dungee as Guildenstern; Michael Harris as Hamlet; Shannon Listol as Ophelia; Paul McLane as Polonius; Barbara Papendorp as Gertrude; Brandon Rice as Rosencrantz; Robert Sheire as Laertes; and Alex Zavistovich as Claudius. 

“Hamlet” is directed by Kevin Finkelstein, who previously directed “Romeo and Juliet” for Lean & Hungry Theater. The assistant director and dramaturg is Hannah Todd. Special effects and musical underscore for Lean & Hungry’s productions are provided by Lean & Hungry Technical Director Gregg Martin.

Aired the evening before Halloween, “Hamlet” is Lean & Hungry’s Halloween treat to DC’s radio listeners. Last year’s Halloween offering from the company was “MacBeth in the 21st Century.”

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