Humankind: Rubin Carter's Hurricane

Memorialized in a Bob Dylan song and an Academy Award-nominated Denzel Washington film, Rubin "Hurricane" Carter was a successful prize fighter who was falsely accused of murder. After spending nearly two decades in prison, Carter was exonerated by a federal judge in a ruling later affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court. Now in his 70s and an outspoken advocate for others who are wrongly convicted, Carter published a spiritual memoir, "Eye of the Hurricane." The book describes how he emerged not only from physical incarceration, but also from the emotional prison of hatred and bitterness.

For more information and to order Rubin Carter's book, visit the Humankind website.


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