Helping Homeless Veterans, A Family Affair | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Helping Homeless Veterans, A Family Affair

Chuck Wolfe connected with Rachael McDermott on LinkedIn and discovered that she and her dad have been volunteering helping homeless veterans. Rachael's Dad, Jim Diana, served as a First Lieutenant in the Army's 9th Infantry Division from 1967-1970. He was deployed to the Mekong Delta during the Vietnam War and led many combat operations. Rachael is the Assistant Director of Employer Relations at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Career Services Office, in Cambridge, MA. In this role she provides career advising to Harvard graduate students and coordinates events and career fairs to connect employers with students.

Rachael and her dad volunteer at the New England Center for Homeless Veterans. Jim volunteers to visit with the disabled homeless veterans, while Rachael is committed to helping them find meaningful work. In the interview, Chuck asked both Rachael and Jim to talk about their feelings volunteering with the veterans and the benefits of helping others. Chuck also asked Rachael to share some job hunting tips to help anyone seeking employment. She shares some wonderful strategies and information that will be helpful to anyone. 


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