Fresh Air Weekend: 'World's End,' Robin Thicke And The 'Sports Gene' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : Fresh Air

Filed Under:

Fresh Air Weekend: 'World's End,' Robin Thicke And The 'Sports Gene'

Play associated audio

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

An Epic Pub Crawl Gone Wrong Culminates In 'World's End': Five old high school friends reunite to finish a 12-pub crawl they started 20 years earlier in the latest from Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Edgar Wright — the creators of the zombie send-up Shaun of the Dead and action comedy Hot Fuzz.

Robin Thicke: Smirky But Sincere On 'Blurred Lines': Listen and look past his roué image, and the chart-topper is revealed as an earnest nostalgist.

Talent Or Skill?: Homing In On The Elusive 'Sports Gene': Do big league hitters have naturally faster reflexes? Are African-Americans predisposed to be better athletes? In his new book, Sports Illustrated's David Epstein says science now has answers — or at least insights — to all these questions.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: Boston's Dick Flavin Is Quizzed On The 'Worst Poet Ever'

Dick Flavin is an Emmy-award winning broadcaster, a PA announcer at Fenway Park and the Poet Laureate of the Boston Red Sox.
NPR

Culinary Siblings Give Pasta A Healthy Makeover

In a low-carb world, pasta has issues. But it's poised for a comeback, say Joseph Bastianich and Tanya Bastianich Manuali, who talk with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about their cookbook, Healthy Pasta.
NPR

Advice For Beleaguered Battleground State Residents: Leave Town

With the presidential campaign season already underway, NPR's Linda Wertheimer has a hot tip for swing state voters feeling besieged: Rent your house to a political operative and take a vacation.
NPR

Company's Secret Weapon To Make Videos Go Viral

Videos don't always go viral just because they're clever or show a cat prancing on a skateboard. Often a company finds the video, promotes it and sells its licensing rights to media buyers.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.