Scorsese Talks 'The Language Of Cinema' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Scorsese Talks 'The Language Of Cinema'

Play associated audio

Martin Scorsese is a legend of a director — and he's also a great film teacher, a man who balances a passion for the medium with a deep knowledge of its history. Delivering this year's installment of the National Endowment for the Humanities' prestigious Jefferson Lecture — a talk he titled "Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema" — Scorsese demonstrated his speaking chops as well.

In this excerpt from the lecture, delivered April 1 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and edited for broadcast by Fresh Air, he talks about the early days of cinema, and about one of the films that stuck with him from childhood.

His parents, worried about young Martin's asthma, took him to the theater regularly instead of encouraging him to participate in sports. It was there that he first saw the 1950 film The Magic Box and fell in love with the pictures moving on that screen in a dark room.

Scorsese also talks about the development of cinema and the evolution of motion pictures — from the early photographic experiments of Eadweard Muybridge to the editing style of D.W. Griffith's 1916 film Intolerance.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.
NPR

Fruit Recall Hits Trader Joe's, Costco, Wal-Mart Stores

The recall applies to "certain lots of whole peaches (white and yellow), nectarines (white and yellow), plums and pluots" from a California packing company, the FDA says.
NPR

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting

In a recent Gallup poll, most named immigration the biggest problem confronting the nation. But past periods of heightened worries have been brief — and haven't brought about solutions.
NPR

9/11 Commission Issues An Update On Anniversary Of Report

Saying that the world has changed "dramatically," the report's authors write that al-Qaida groups have spread, and the threat for cyberterrorism has grown.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.