Fresh Air Weekend: Blanco And Bazelon | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Fresh Air Weekend: Blanco And Bazelon

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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco: 'I Finally Felt Like I Was Home': Blanco, who read his poem "One Today" at Obama's second inauguration, is the first immigrant, Latino and openly gay poet chosen to read at an inauguration. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that while he was on the podium, "I really embraced America up there like I never had before."

Today's Bullied Teens Subject To 'Sticks And Stones' Online, Too: In her new book, Slate senior editor Emily Bazelon explores teen bullying, what it is and what it isn't, and how the rise of the Internet and social media make the experience more challenging. "It really can make bullying feel like it's 24/7," she says.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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