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Fresh Air Weekend: Michael Feinstein, Roxy Music, Tyler Perry

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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'Gershwins And Me' Tells The Stories Behind 12 Songs: Musician Michael Feinstein chronicles his experience working as an archivist and cataloger for legendary songwriter Ira Gershwin. The book is presented through the stories of 12 of the Gershwin brothers' songs, including "Fascinating Rhythm," "The Man I Love" and "I Got Rhythm."

More Than This: The 'Complete' Roxy Music: Ed Ward connects the dots of the British band's eight studio albums, which were just collected in a box set.

Tyler Perry Transforms: From Madea To Family Man: Best known for being the man behind Madea, Perry is now starring in the action thriller Alex Cross. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his Madea character is a cross between his mom, his aunt and Eddie Murphy.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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