Fresh Air Weekend: Mike Birbiglia, Bill Hader | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Fresh Air Weekend: Mike Birbiglia, Bill Hader

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Mike Birbiglia, 'Sleepwalk'-ing On The Big Screen: The comedian co-wrote a film with Ira Glass, of public radio's This American Life, about his life and sleepwalking disorder. But making Sleepwalk With Me, based on Birbiglia's one-man show and comedic memoir, caused Birbiglia anxiety — which exacerbated his disorder.

Bill Hader On Sketch Comedy, His Love Of Old Films: Saturday Night Live's Bill Hader, nominated for an Emmy for his character Stefon, an obsessive clubgoer, says he needs a character to be funny. Hader tells Fresh Air that he doesn't know how people do standup — and that watching old films as a child sparked his interest in Hollywood.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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