Freakonomics: The Power Of The President... And The Thumb | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics: The Power Of The President... And The Thumb

In this Freakonomics Radio episode, we ask a simple, heretical question: How much does the President of the United States really matter? Stephen Dubner talks to former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, economists Austan Goolsbee and Justin Wolfers, and constitutional scholar Bernadette Meyler about how the President's actual influence can be measured; and Steve Levitt weighs in on how he thinks the President shapes the nation, and whether he'll be voting in the next election.

Also in this episode, we examine another supposed truism: hitchhiking is terribly dangerous. True? The fact is that hitchhiking has practically disappeared in America. But why? Was it really as dangerous as we believed? Even if so, what other factors were at play? Among our guests are data wizard Bill James, who says our risk aversion to hitchhiking makes it more dangerous, and transportation scholar Alan Pisarski, who looks at how hitchhiking can inform future transportation policy. Would our society be better off with more hitchhiking?

NPR

Jenner: 'For All Intents And Purposes, I Am A Woman'

In an interview with Diane Sawyer on ABC's "20/20", the former gold-medal-winning Olympic decathlete described a struggle with gender identity that began in childhood.
NPR

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

The company says Diet Pepsi consumers are concerned about aspartame. But the Food and Drug Administration has long affirmed that the sweetener is safe in amounts commonly used by beverage companies.
NPR

Week In Politics: Clinton Foundation, Drone Strikes

NPR's Melissa Block talks with E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times about the Clinton Foundation financial news and drone strikes.
NPR

At The Heart Of A Watch, Tested By Time

Watchmakers have long thrived by selling timepieces that will be cherished as family heirlooms. But, if pragmatism rendered the pocket watch obsolete, what happens when watches become computers?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.