Crack: The Drug That Consumed The Nation's Capital

Washington, D.C. is in the midst of major change — its population is growing, new high-rise buildings can be seen across the city, and the homicide rate is at historic lows. But 25 years ago, dealers sold crack at hundreds of open-air drug markets, addiction swept across entire neighborhoods, and the city came to be known as the "Nation's Murder Capital." In this documentary, WAMU 88.5 explores the legacy of that era and how D.C. continues to grapple with an epidemic that affected families, neighborhoods, politicians, policemen, and schools.


NPR

Russian Hacking, Spies, Wikileaks: "Breaking Cover" Has A Lot In Common With The Week In Politics

Former M15 boss Dame Stella Rimington talks with Scott Simon about her new book, and her previous career in espionage.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

A Look At Where Bernie Sanders' Movement Goes From Here

Bernie Sanders may have lost the Democratic race for President, but his supporters believe some of his ideas won. Sanders surrogate Jonathan Tasini looks at his legacy.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.