Bob Edwards Weekend | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Bob Edwards Weekend

Schedule
88.5-1
Saturday
6:00 am
88.3
Saturday
6:00 am

Bob Edwards Weekend showcases interviews through which celebrated host Bob Edwards highlights the life and work of interesting people, from newsmakers, historians, and authors to artists, actors, and regular folks too. A sampling:

  • former President Jimmy Carter
  • former House Speaker Newt Gingrich
  • actors George Clooney and David Strathairn
  • former gang members in L.A. and the priest who helped them leave the gangs.

 

Each program features an artful mix of natural sound, music, readings, film clips, and more. Typically, Edwards speaks with 3-5 guests in each program, but occasionally, one interview will comprise an entire hour. And Edwards regularly goes outside the studio; to Oklahoma City for the 10th anniversary of the Murrah Federal Building bombing; to Chicago for a conversation with Studs Terkel in his home; to Austin for interviews with artists and filmmakers at the South by Southwest Festival.

Bob Edwards Weekend - a superb host talking with fascinating people.


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