The Big Fix | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

The Big Fix

The Big Fix is a forum for people to present their new domestic policy ideas to experts of different political viewpoints. We move past the intense and unimaginative partisanship in Washington to explore what people want from government and how they want to achieve those goals.

If you want to submit an idea for "The Big Fix," please fill out this form through the Public Insight Network.

About The Big Fix:

There are more than 300 million people in America, but only a sliver of them are paid to make and influence public policy. We give the average person the opportunity to present their innovative idea to people in power. Move past the intense and unimaginative partisanship in Washington by proposing great domestic policy ideas — original ideas that don't require more spending or taxes, but that improve our quality of life. Through discussing the merits of new ideas, we explore what people want from government and how they want to achieve those goals. We show that good ideas can rise above the fray to unite divided political groups and to change the future of America.

The Big Fix Host:

Host and creator Al Lewis is no stranger to new ideas, both good and bad.  His books Why the Heck Aren't We Already Doing This Stuff? and its predecessor OOBonomics: 12 Great Outside the Box Economic Policy Ideas No One Has Thought Of are chock full of mostly good ones.

As for bad ideas, Al's "day job" is ferreting them out in health care policy.  He has assembled dozens of them into a hilarious, critically acclaimed, book called Why Nobody Believes the Numbers, eviscerating healthcare policies-gone-wild, policies that endure mostly because they are supported by what one of Al's heroes, Christopher Robin, might call "politicians of very little brain."

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