Big Picture Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Big Picture Science

Schedule
88.5-3
Sunday
11:00 am

In one hour, Big Picture Science connects ideas about the origins, the behavior, and the future of life – and technology – on Earth in surprising and playful ways. 

The world has changed since enterprising hominids chipped stones to use as tools. Today’s scientific and technological development moves faster than a speeding maglev train.

If you’re curious about where innovation is headed and delight in the wonders of scientific discovery, tune your ears to Big Picture Science. Science radio doesn’t have to be dull. The only dry thing about our program is the humor.

What came before the Big Bang? How does memory work? Will our descendants be human or machine? What’s the origin of humor? We ponder these questions daily...and expound on them weekly.

But wait! There’s more!

Are you a doubting Thomas? Good. Join us as we separate science from pseudoscience – and facts from the phony – in Skeptic Check, our monthly episode devoted to critical thinking.

Whether it’s astrology, Bigfoot, or just the incessant onslaught of dubious medical claims, we take it all on, wielding the skeptical tools of solid science.

It’s Skeptic Check… but don’t take our word for it...!


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