WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 20

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Brett Busang demonstrates a sense of nostalgia for working class roots in his paintings of D.C.-area neighborhoods.
Joe's Movement Emporium
Brett Busang demonstrates a sense of nostalgia for working class roots in his paintings of D.C.-area neighborhoods.

August 22: Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars w/ Harper Simon

Harper Simon, son of legendary musician Paul Simon, is teaming up with Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars for a one-night-only performance this Friday at the Black Cat. A guitarist, Simon released his debut album in 2010 and dropped a second record last year. In his more recent work, the artist breaks away from the acoustic, alt-country sound of his freshman album by leaning on electric guitars for a rock 'n' roll feel.

August 20-Sept. 15: Along Rhode Island: Paintings of Outer Washington

In a solo show at Joe's Movement Emporium, artist Brett Busang paints a picture of four local neighborhoods in transition: Gaithersburg, Mount Rainier, where the gallery is located, and the Northeast D.C. neighborhoods Brookland and Brentwood. Along Rhode Island: Paintings of Outer Washington will be on view through September 15.

Music: "Somewhere They Can't Find Me (Instrumental)" by Simon & Garfunkel

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